Grace's Guide

British Industrial History

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R. J. and E. Coupe

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1868 Winding Engine
June 1880.

of Worsley Mesnes Ironworks, Wigan.

1850 The business started as R. and J. Coupe at Clayton Lane, Wigan. Younger brother Edward later joined the business.

1863 They moved to a new factory at Worsley Mesnes in 1863/1864.[1]

1868 Winding engine for Blacklyhurst Colliery, St Helens. See illustration. Cylinders 24" dia, 5 ft stroke [2]

pre-1871: Winding engines, 12" bore 3' 6" stroke, with 12' drum, for hauling barrows for blast furnace charging at the Hematite Ironworks, Askam-in-Furness[3]

1871 Advertisement: 'MESSRS. R. J. & E. COUPE, Engineers, of Worsley Mesnes Ironworks, Wigan, have great pleasure informing their Friends and the Public that they have taken the Salford Brewery, Worsley-street, Salford, for Show Rooms, in which they have now stored several horizontal high-pressure steam engines. Some are fitted out in pairs complete, colliery winding engines, with slot link motion, though equally well adapted for manufacturing purposes; others, again, are the ordinary engines, suitable either for winding or for regular turning, required. As engines are being constantly taken from and added to stock, it is impossible to particularise but their aim is have a full collection, varying from 10in. to 20in. bore of cylinder, and from 18in. to 36in. stroke.' [4]

1874 Joseph died.

1880 Makers of stationary engines for rolling mills, winding and pumping (see advert).

1886 Richard died. Shortly afterwards, Edward advertised the business for sale. The works were bought by J P & S Melling. (presumably John William Melling and Samuel Melling and ?)

Eventually taken over by Worsley Mesnes Ironworks Ltd.[5]


See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. Article 'What Auntie Winnie Said' by Joan Francis (nee Coupe) in 'Past Forward' Issue 30 [1]
  2. 'The Engineer' 30th October 1868
  3. 'The Engineer' 28th July 1871
  4. Leeds Mercury, 14th February 1871
  5. The Engineer 1926/05/21