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Difference between revisions of "North Bridge at Edinburgh Waverley"

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This entry refers to the steel and iron arch bridge which takes the A7 road over Edinburgh Waverley Station.
 
This entry refers to the steel and iron arch bridge which takes the A7 road over Edinburgh Waverley Station.
  
Built 1894–97 to replace a bridge built in the late 18th century to link the Old and New Towns. Three steel segmental arch spans of 175 ft, with outer facades of cast-iron. The engineers were [[Cunningham, Blyth and Westland]] of Edinburgh. Steel and ironwork contractor: [[William Arrol and Co|Sir William Arrol and Co]]. The masonry  subcontractors were [[William Beattie and Sons]].<ref>[https://canmore.org.uk/site/303391/edinburgh-north-bridge] CANMORE website: Edinburgh, North Bridge, with information from R Paxton and S Shipway's 'Civil Engineering Heritage: Scotland - Lowlands and Borders', Thomas Telford Publishers, 2007.</ref>
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Built 1894–97 when the station was widened. Replaced a bridge built in the late 18th century to link the Old and New Towns. Three steel segmental arch spans of 175 ft, with outer facades of cast-iron. The engineers were [[Cunningham, Blyth and Westland]] of Edinburgh. Steel and ironwork contractor: [[William Arrol and Co|Sir William Arrol and Co]]. The masonry  subcontractors were [[William Beattie and Sons]].<ref>[https://canmore.org.uk/site/303391/edinburgh-north-bridge] CANMORE website: Edinburgh, North Bridge, with information from R Paxton and S Shipway's 'Civil Engineering Heritage: Scotland - Lowlands and Borders', Thomas Telford Publishers, 2007.</ref>. See also 'The Engineer', 19 January 1895.
  
 
The previous masonry bridge was built between 1763 and 1769 to the design of [[William Mylne]]. Shortly after completion a vault and side wall collapsed resulting in five deaths. Modifications were undertaken on the advice of [[John Smeaton]], and the work was completed in 1772.<ref>[https://canmore.org.uk/site/90306/edinburgh-north-bridge] CANMORE website: Edinburgh, North Bridge (18th C. bridge), with information from R Paxton and S Shipway's 'Civil Engineering Heritage: Scotland - Lowlands and Borders', Thomas Telford Publishers, 2007.</ref>
 
The previous masonry bridge was built between 1763 and 1769 to the design of [[William Mylne]]. Shortly after completion a vault and side wall collapsed resulting in five deaths. Modifications were undertaken on the advice of [[John Smeaton]], and the work was completed in 1772.<ref>[https://canmore.org.uk/site/90306/edinburgh-north-bridge] CANMORE website: Edinburgh, North Bridge (18th C. bridge), with information from R Paxton and S Shipway's 'Civil Engineering Heritage: Scotland - Lowlands and Borders', Thomas Telford Publishers, 2007.</ref>
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Note: The widening of the station also required the construction of the Waverley Bridge, at the west end of the station, described in 'The Engineer', 9 August 1895.
  
 
== See Also ==
 
== See Also ==

Latest revision as of 20:23, 14 June 2019

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This entry refers to the steel and iron arch bridge which takes the A7 road over Edinburgh Waverley Station.

Built 1894–97 when the station was widened. Replaced a bridge built in the late 18th century to link the Old and New Towns. Three steel segmental arch spans of 175 ft, with outer facades of cast-iron. The engineers were Cunningham, Blyth and Westland of Edinburgh. Steel and ironwork contractor: Sir William Arrol and Co. The masonry subcontractors were William Beattie and Sons.[1]. See also 'The Engineer', 19 January 1895.

The previous masonry bridge was built between 1763 and 1769 to the design of William Mylne. Shortly after completion a vault and side wall collapsed resulting in five deaths. Modifications were undertaken on the advice of John Smeaton, and the work was completed in 1772.[2]

Note: The widening of the station also required the construction of the Waverley Bridge, at the west end of the station, described in 'The Engineer', 9 August 1895.

See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. [1] CANMORE website: Edinburgh, North Bridge, with information from R Paxton and S Shipway's 'Civil Engineering Heritage: Scotland - Lowlands and Borders', Thomas Telford Publishers, 2007.
  2. [2] CANMORE website: Edinburgh, North Bridge (18th C. bridge), with information from R Paxton and S Shipway's 'Civil Engineering Heritage: Scotland - Lowlands and Borders', Thomas Telford Publishers, 2007.