Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

Registered UK Charity (No. 115342)

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Difference between revisions of "Julius Robert Mayer"

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A German physician and physicist and one of the founders of thermodynamics. He is best known for enunciating in 1841 one of the original statements of the conservation of energy or what is now known as one of the first versions of the first law of thermodynamics, namely that "energy can be neither created nor destroyed".<ref>[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julius_Robert_von_Mayer Wikipedia]</ref>
A German physician and physicist and one of the founders of thermodynamics. He is best known for enunciating in 1841 one of the original statements of the conservation of energy or what is now known as one of the first versions of the first law of thermodynamics, namely that "energy can be neither created nor destroyed".<ref>[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julius_Robert_von_Mayer Wikipedia]</ref>


Died 1878 after illness, aged 63. Obituary in The Engineer. <ref>[[The Engineer 1878/03/29]], p223.</ref>
Died 1878 after illness, aged 63.  
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''' 1878 Obituary <ref>[[The Engineer 1878/03/29]], p223.</ref>


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''' 1878 Obituary <ref>[[Engineering 1878 Jan-Jun: Index: General Index]]</ref>
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== See Also ==
== See Also ==

Latest revision as of 04:48, 5 March 2017

Dr. Julius Robert Mayer (1814-1878) aka (Julius von Mayer)

Born in Heilbronn, 25th November 1814.

A German physician and physicist and one of the founders of thermodynamics. He is best known for enunciating in 1841 one of the original statements of the conservation of energy or what is now known as one of the first versions of the first law of thermodynamics, namely that "energy can be neither created nor destroyed".[1]

Died 1878 after illness, aged 63.


1878 Obituary [2]



1878 Obituary [3]



See Also

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