Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

Registered UK Charity (No. 115342)

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Deepdale Viaduct

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This iron trestle viaduct, at Deepdale on the Stainmore Railway, was demolished in the 1960s.

Designed by Thomas Bouch and Robert H. Bow, and constructed by Gilkes, Wilson and Co of Middlesbrough. The trestles and lattice girders were assembled from standardised components (also used for Beelah Viaduct), with the aid of a small travelling crane, enabling 80 men to build the viaduct in just 47 days. The last girder was placed in December 1858 [1]

The piers' trestle legs were assembled from flanged cast iron 'pipes' of 12" diameter, 15 ft long, cross-braced by wrought iron beams and tie bars. The piers were spaced at 65 ft centres, and the tallest was 175 ft high. The lattice girders were approx 6 ft 6" deep.[2]

Each pier had six 12" hollow columns forming a tapering tower, braced together by cross girders every 15 ft. The lattice girders were 6 ft. 6" deep. The span between the piers was 60 ft., and the extreme height of the viaduct 175ft. Ten piers carried the viaduct across the valley.[3]

See here for more information and interesting illustrations, including an 1858 photo taken during construction, which highlights the slenderness of the iron piers, and the modest size of the masonry bases.

See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. Newcastle Daily Chronicle - Saturday 4 December 1858
  2. Illustrated Times - Saturday 30 April 1859
  3. [1] The Engineer, 19 Nov 1858, p.393 (short letter from 'Spectator' of Middlesbrough