Grace's Guide

British Industrial History

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Difference between revisions of "Constructional Engineering Co"

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1922 Products included: Cupolas, foundry ladles, charging platforms, shaking barrels, air receivers, runways moulding boxes, sand blast plant, foundry requisites
 
1922 Products included: Cupolas, foundry ladles, charging platforms, shaking barrels, air receivers, runways moulding boxes, sand blast plant, foundry requisites
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1922 Supplied a cupola, ladles, and other equipment for the iron and brass foundry built at the Grytviken whaling station on the island of South Georgia<ref>[https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=njp.32101048916165;view=1up;seq=393;size=125] 'The Foundry' March 15, 1922, p.243</ref>
  
 
1926 July. Orders received from [[Falkirk Iron Co]], Excelsior Foundry Co, [[Newton, Chambers and Co]] and  [[Brown and Green]].
 
1926 July. Orders received from [[Falkirk Iron Co]], Excelsior Foundry Co, [[Newton, Chambers and Co]] and  [[Brown and Green]].

Latest revision as of 07:51, 24 June 2017

1940.
1960

of Titan Works, Birmingham.

1911 Company formed by W. H. Wood and D. H. Wood

1922 Products included: Cupolas, foundry ladles, charging platforms, shaking barrels, air receivers, runways moulding boxes, sand blast plant, foundry requisites

1922 Supplied a cupola, ladles, and other equipment for the iron and brass foundry built at the Grytviken whaling station on the island of South Georgia[1]

1926 July. Orders received from Falkirk Iron Co, Excelsior Foundry Co, Newton, Chambers and Co and Brown and Green.

1926 November. Introduced a new material "Titanite", a new patternmaking material in the form of a kind of stone powder which when mixed in the right proportions with the proper liquid, could be poured into a mould, and after allowing from four to six hours for setting, will give a pattern plate which in appearance strongly resembled marble, but with a surface that could be readily finished by means of a file or sandpaper.[2]

See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. [1] 'The Foundry' March 15, 1922, p.243
  2. The Engineer 1926/11/12