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British Industrial History

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Allen Everitt and Sons

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May 1928.

Allen, Everitt and Sons, of Birmingham, later of Kingston Metal Works, Smethwick

Makers of non-ferrous tubes, copper-nickel condenser tubes produced in a state-of-the-art factory.

1769 The business's foundations were laid as far back as 1769

1800 The business was established - the original works were in Adderley Street, Liverpool Street and Glover Street, Birmingham.

1856 Allen Everitt and Son, of Birmingham, subscribed £10 to the Smith Testimonial Fund, commemorating the work of F. P. Smith in promoting the screw propeller.

1862 Exhibited a range of brass, copper, and iron articles

By 1868 The tube and wire works of Messrs. Allen, Everitt, and Sons covered a wide area of ground on both sides of the canal, and employed several hundred hands. Apart from the smelting of the ore Messrs. Everitt carried on every operation connected with the manufacture within their works, from refining the pig copper and casting the ingots to the final scouring and annealing of the articles. They also manufactured of sheet and foil copper and brass.[1]

1890 The company was registered on 5 June, to acquire the business of copper and brass tube manufacturers, carried on by the firm of the same name. [2]

1890 Kingston site acquired

Allen Everitt and Sons a firm which specialized in the manufacture of condenser tubes, moved in stages from Birmingham to the Kingston Works in Bridge Street, Smethwick between the early 1890s and 1902.

1926/9 Allen Everitt and Sons became part of the ICI Metals Division.

1958 Another I.C.I. subsidiary, Yorkshire Imperial Metals, was then formed to take in the Yorkshire Copper Works of Leeds and the plate, tube, and fittings interests of I.C.I.; it was making non-ferrous tubes, fittings, and plates at the Kingston Works (renamed the Allen Everitt Works) in 1971.

1958 Company closed.

See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. The Engineer 1868/03/20
  2. The Stock Exchange Year Book 1908
  • From: 'Smethwick: Economic history', A History of the County of Stafford: Volume 17: Offlow hundred (part) (1976), pp. 107-118. URL: [1].
  • Records of IMI in Birmingham archives [2]