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British Industrial History

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William Wilkinson (1817- )

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William Wilkinson (c1817- ) of Wilkinson, Wright and Co and Lewin, Wilkinson and Co

1861 Living at Witham Town, Boston: William Wilkinson (age 44 born Lincoln), Engineer employing 50 men and 20 boys. With his wife Sarah Wilkinson (age 45 born Boston) and their three daughters; Ann Wilkinson (age 20 born Boston); Sarah Wilkinson (age 7 born Boston); and Kate Wilkinson (age 4 born Boston). One servant.[1]

1865 August. 'On Saturday evening Mr. W. Wilkinson, of the Poole foundry, entertained the workmen in his employ at supper at the Antelope Hotel, on the occasion of the marriage of his daughter.'[2] (Ann Mountain Wilkinson married Henry Brougham Sedgfield)

1865 Advert: 'W. WILKINSON (LATE WILLIAM PEARCE,) MANUFACTURERS OF ALL KINDS OF AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS, Iron Merchants, Engineers, Millwrights, Iron and Brass Founders. MANUFACTURERS OF PORTABLE AND FIXED STEAM ENGINES AND BOILERS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. Poole'[3]

1869 Bankrupt. 'William Wilkinson, formerly of Boston, Lincoln, then of Poole, Dorset, engineer and ironfounder, carrying on business at the latter place in partnership with Stephen Lewin, as Lewin, Wilkinson, & Co., now of 6, Cedars Row, Lavender Hill, Clapham, Surrey, manager to a corn chandler'[4]

1869 Bankruptcy discharge hearing. '...application for order of discharge under the bankruptcy of William Wilkinson, described as of Boston and Poole, engineer and ironfounder, carrying on business at the latter place in partnership with Stephen Lewin as "Lewin, Wilkinson, and Co.," and now of the Cedars-row, Lavender-hill, Clapham, manager to corn chandler....attributing his bankruptcy to the following causes, viz., "Liabilities to late partner, Stephen Lewin, for which the petitioner gave bills of exchange, and being sued for one of these bills he finds himself unable pay the amount."....the bankrupt was formerly in partnership with Mr. Lewin, and carried on the business of engineers and ironfounders, but inasmuch as Mr. Lewin also carried on the business of a corn factor, it was agreed that the bankrupt should receive £200 a year for managing that business, so that all the books, receipts, and papers were under his control. The partnership was dissolved in September, 1868, and Mr. Lewin paid the bankrupt £500 as his share of the partnership assets, and the bankrupt then entered into a covenant with Mr. Lewin not to collect any money of the partnership debts. Shortly after the dissolution transpired that various sums of money had been received by the bankrupt which he had not entered in the books, and a professional accountant was employed to through them, when it was found he had received above £1500. The bankrupt did not deny that, but he made proposition to pay Mr. Lewin off by instalments; but Mr. Lewin refused his off....’[5]

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Sources of Information

  1. 1861 Census
  2. Dorset County Chronicle - Thursday 24 August 1865
  3. Poole & Dorset Herald - Thursday 16 November 1865
  4. The Edinburgh Gazette Publication date:8 June 1869 Issue:7961 Page:66
  5. Stamford Mercury - Friday 13 August 1869