Grace's Guide

British Industrial History

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 130,457 pages of information and 207,683 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

William Munton Bullivant

From Graces Guide

Jump to: navigation, search

William Munton Bullivant (1828-1908), chairman of Bullivant and Co

1855 November 5th. Married at Stroud to Mary Browne Pelham

1855 Shown as 'W. M. Bullivant, 72 Mark Lane, London E.C.' and the contact for prospectus for the Thames Nautical Training College.[1]

1861 Living at (?) Villa, Richmond Road, Hackney: William Bullivant (age 33 born Kennington), Commercial Traveller. With his wife Mary Bullivant (age 27 born Rotherhithe) and their three children; Mary Bullivant (age 4 born Stepney); William Bullivant (age 3 born Hackney); and Agness Bullivant (age 1 born Hackney). Also his mother Hewnrietta Bullivant (age 72 born Enfield). Two servants.[2]

1871 Living at 8 Clapton Terrace, Hackney: William Bullivant (age 42 born Kennington), Wire Rope and Telegraph Manufacturer. With his wife Mary M. Bullivant (age 37 born Rotherhithe) and their six children; Agnes Bullivant (age 11 born Hackney); Frederick Bullivant (age 9 born Hackney); Rose M. Bullivant (age 8 born Hackney); Thomas T. Bullivant (age 6 born Hackney); Percy J. Bullivant (age 4 born Hackney); and Lettany Bullivant (age 2 born Hackney). Three servants.[3]


1908 Obituary [4]

We regret that we have to record the death of Mr. William Morton Bullivant, which occurred at his home at Beckenham on the 22nd ult.

Mr. Bullivant was born at Plymouth in 1828, and be received his early education in that town. At the early age of fifteen he went to sea, but after four years he left it and came to London, when he became associated with Mr. James Stephenson, who was engaged in the manufacture of wire ropes.

He then went into partnership with Mr. J. H. Allen, bought Mr. Stephenson's business, and devoted all his energies to the manufacture of wire ropes, which be early foresaw must eventually succeed the hemp rope. Much opposition was experienced at first, and it was not until 1874, when he invented and introduced flexible steel wire ropes, that his efforts were crowned with success. Up to this time wire rope had only been used for standing rigging and mining purposes, but there was an ever-growing field for their use, and they rapidly began to supersede chain and hemp in many fields of engineering.

Later, Mr. Bullivant took over the then Wire Tramway Company, and developed this branch of the business to a considerable extent, and was indeed one of the pioneers or the aerial ropeway system of transporting materials.

Probably one of the most important innovation s for which Mr. Bullivant was responsible was the Bullivant system of net defence against torpedo attack, which is now so largely used on all modern warships.

At the time of his death Mr. Bullivant was in his eighty-first year. He still took some active part in business affairs, and was chairman of Bullivant and Co., Limited, of Mark lane, E.C.


1908 Obituary [5]

W. M. BULLIVANT died at his residence at Beckenham, on Sept. 22, 1908.

He was born at Plymouth in 1828, and received his early education in that town. After obtaining some experience in the production of hempen rope, he adopted the sea as a profession. Here he was impressed with the need for improving the ropes and hawsers of that period, and after four years he came to London, where he became associated with James Stephenson, who was engaged in the manufacture of wire ropes.

He then went into partnership with J. H. Allen, and devoted all his energies to wire ropes, which he early foresaw must eventually succeed hempen rope. Much opposition Was experienced at first, and it was not until 1874, when he invented and introduced flexible steel wire ropes, that his efforts were crowned with success. Up to this period wire ropes had only been used for standing rigging and mining purposes, but there was an ever-growing field for their use, and they rapidly began to supersede chain and hemp in many fields of engineering.

Later, he took over the then Wire Tramway Company, and developed this branch of the business to a considerable extent, and was indeed one of the pioneers of the aerial ropeway system of transporting materials. The deceased gentleman was also the inventor of the Bullivant system of net defence against torpedo attack, which is now so largely used on all modern warships.

At the time of his death he still took an active part in business affairs, and was chairman of Bullivant & Co., Ltd., while for upwards of forty-five years he acted as secretary of the training ship Worcester, moored in the Thames, for the training of naval cadets. He was elected a member of the Iron and Steel Institute in 1872.


See Also

Loading...

Sources of Information

  1. Luton Times and Advertiser - Tuesday 06 March 1855
  2. 1861 Census
  3. 1871 Census
  4. The Engineer 1908/10/02
  5. 1908 Iron and Steel Institute: Obituaries