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British Industrial History

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William Carpmael

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William Carpmael (1804-1867)

1830 William Carpmael of the Patent Office, Lincoln's Inn Square, Mechanical Draughtsman, became a member of the Institution of Civil Engineers.[1]

1835 of Poole and Carpmael, patents agents and consulting engineers

1849 Partnership dissolved

1856 of the Patent Office, subscribed £21 to the Smith Testimonial Fund, commemorating the work of F. P. Smith in promoting the screw propeller.

1862 William Carpmael, 24 Southampton Buildings, London.[2]

1867 July 9th. Died.[3]


1870 Obituary [4]

MR. WILLIAM CARPMAEL was born in London, on the 27th February, 1804.

After receiving a mercantile education, he became an assistant in the laboratory of Mr. Kellerman, a chemist, at Luton, in Bedfordshire. There he remained about two years, and obtained a knowledge of the rudiments of chemistry.

He afterwards became a pupil of the late Professor Millington, with whom he studied for some years, and under whose supervision he prepared, amongst other things, the working drawings for the bridge over the river Thames at Great Marlow, the erection of which he also superintended.

Subsequently he designed and erected salt works in Cheshire for the late Mr. Furnival, and these works he managed for some time.

Having, however, become connected with the late Mr. Poole, the Attorney General’s clerk of the Patents with whom he entered into partnership in 1835 as a patent agent and consulting engineer, he ceased to occupy himself with the constructive branch of engineering. The general knowledge of law, which he now required, was obtained by reading with a special pleader, the late Mr. Colman, of the Temple. He also qualified himself for, the bar, and, though never called, was a member of Lincoln’s Inn.

In the consideration of engineering questions he specially excelled by his rapid and firm grasp of new mechanical ideas, and by the closeness and accuracy with which he was able to define them. Every one engaged in matters connected with patents knew that Mr. Carpmael was a strenuous and persistent advocate for an amendment in the Lam of Patents, that he took an active part before the various Committees of the Houses of Parliament on Bills to promote that object, and that he published several useful and practical works bearing on the subject of patents for inventions.

Mr. Carpmael was elected an Associate of the Institution of Civil Engineers on the 16th of March, 1830, served on the Council in the year 1838, was transferred to the class of Members on the 14th of June, 1840, and for many years was a constant attendant at the meetings, and took part in the discussions. He was also a Member of the Royal Institution, and of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, and an Associate of the Institution of Naval Architects. On the formation of the Metropolitan Board of Works he was elected a member of it, and remained so until his death, taking an active part in the promotion of the projects for the Main Drainage of London and for the Thames Embankment.

Mr. Carpmael died on the 9th of July, 1867, in the sixty-fourth year of his age.


1868 Obituary [5]

WILLIAM CARPMAEL was born in London On 27th February 1804, and after receiving an ordinary mercantile education became assistant in the laboratory of a chemist named Kellerman at Luton in Bedfordshire, where he remained for two years and obtained a knowledge of the rudiments of chemistry.

He afterwards became a pupil of the late Professor Millington, with whom he studied for some years, and under whose supervision he prepared, amongst other engineering works, the working drawings of the bridge over the Thames at Great Marlow, the erection of which he also superintended.

Subsequently he designed and erected salt works in Cheshire for the late Mr. Furnival, and these works he managed for some time.

Having however become connected with the late Mr. Poole, the attorney-general's clerk of the patents, with whom he subsequently entered into partnership in 1835 as a patent agent and consulting engineer, he ceased to occupy himself with the constructive branch of engineering. The general knowledge of law which he now required, he obtained by reading with a special pleader, the late Mr. Colman of the Temple; he also qualified himself for the bar, though never called, and was a member of Lincoln's Inn.

In the consideration of engineering questions he specially excelled in his rapid and firm grasp of new mechanical ideas, and in the closeness and accuracy with which he was able to define them.

He became first an Associate and afterwards a Member of the Institution of Civil Engineers, and for some time was on the Council.

On the formation of the Metropolitan Board of Works he was elected a member of it, and remained as until his death, taking an active part in the promotion of the project for the Main Drainage and for the Thames Embankment.

He became a Member of this Institution in 1862; and died on 9th July 1867 at the age of 63.


See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. 1830 Institution of Civil Engineers
  2. 1862 Institution of Mechanical Engineers
  3. 1862 Institution of Mechanical Engineers
  4. 1870 Institution of Civil Engineers: Obituaries
  5. 1868 Institution of Mechanical Engineers: Obituaries