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British Industrial History

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Waterford, Limerick and Western Railway

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1890. 'Sir James', designed by John George Robinson. From 'The Engineer', 12 Sept 1890

1896 The Waterford and Limerick Railway became the Waterford, Limerick and Western Railway.

1901 Amalgamated with and became part of the Great Southern and Western Railway.(Route: 342 miles).

The locomotives of the W&LR and the W,L&WR are listed below.

Eight 2-4-0 locomotives were built by Dubs between 1889 and 1893:[1]

Engine No. Name
Locomotives by Dubs (1889-1893)
10 Sir James
20 Callee More
22 Era
23 Slieve-Na-Mon
43 Knockma
44 Nephin
47 Carrick Castle
48 Cranston

Three 4-4-0s were built by Kitson in 1896-7, no 53 Jubilee, 54 Killemnee and 55 Bernard, which became GSWR 296-8, also losing their names. (No 297 was scrapped in 1928 but the other two lasted until 1949.)[2]

1891 Vulcan Foundry built two 2-4-2 tank engines: 13 Derry Castle and 14 Lough Derg for the Limerick-Tralee line

1895 Kitson and Co built two 0-4-4 tank engines for the Tuam service: 51 Castle Hacket and 52 Brian Boru.

1896-7 16 Rocklands, 17 Faugh a Ballagh, 18 Geraldine and 21 Castle Blarney built by Robinson and Kitson and Co.

1895-7 Dubs built four 0-6-0s: 45 Colleen Baton, 46 Erin Go Bragh, 49 Dreadnought and 50 Hercules.

1897-9 Kitson and Co built four 0-6-0s: 56 Thunderer, 57 Cyclops, 58 Goliath, 2 Shannon.


See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. Outline of Irish Railway History by H. C. Casserley, Chapter 4 pp.78—85 (1974)..
  2. Outline of Irish Railway History by H. C. Casserley, Chapter 4 pp.78—85 (1974).
  • Outline of Irish Railway History by H. C. Casserley, Chapter 4 pp.78—85 (1974). (available in the SMCL)