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Walter Dixon

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Walter Dixon (1861-1926) of Walter Dixon and Co


1926 Obituary [1]

WALTER DIXON was born in Hull in 1861, and was educated in that city.

His engineering career was commenced with Messrs. Amos and Smith, Ltd., Engineers, Hull, with whom he remained for about ten years.

He then joined Messrs. Richard Hornsby and Sons, Ltd., Grantham, for whom he supervised some important contracts.

In 1891 he joined Mr. M. B. Mountain, in Glasgow, who represented the firm of Messrs. Ernest Scott and Mountain, Ltd., of Newcastle, the Priestman Oil Engines and other interests.

He afterwards founded the firm of Walter Dixon and Co. in Glasgow and carried out many important iron and steel works electrification contracts, being a pioneer in the introduction of three-phase alternating current in this connexion.

He was also connected, at this stage, with the late Mr. James Riley in the early development of the gas-engine for iron and steel works.

In 1903 he gave up his contracting practice in favour of consulting work, and for a period of over twenty years was associated with the Ebbw Vale Steel, Iron and Coal Co.,. Ltd., for whom he carried out a complete electrification scheme which involved several large power stations with a total output of over 30,000 kilowatts. He was also responsible for the first complete dock electrification in this country, at Glasgow, which embodied many quite new features.

Mr. Dixon's interests were varied, for he was a Member of the Institution of Electrical Engineers, and many other engineering and scientific societies, to which he contributed a number of Papers.

Mr. Dixon became a Member of this Institution in 1898, and was Chairman of the Glasgow and West Scotland Branch in 1926.

He died on 12th July 1926, at his residence in Glasgow.


1926 Obituary [2]

WALTER DIXON, who died on the 12th July, 1926, was born in Hull in 1861, and was educated in that city.

He commenced his engineering career with Messrs. Amos and Smith, Ltd., engineers, Hull, with whom he remained for about 10 years.

On leaving he joined the firm of Messrs. Richard Hornby and Sons, Ltd., Grantham, for whom he supervised some important contracts in London, Ireland and other places.

In 1891 he went to Glasgow to join Mr. M. B. Mountain, who represented the firm of Messrs. Ernest. Scott and Mountain, Ltd., Newcastle, the Priestman oil engines and other interests.

He afterwards founded the firm of Walter Dixon and Co. electrical contractors, Glasgow, and carried out many important iron and steel works electrification schemes. At this stage also he was connected with the late Mr. James Riley in the early development of the gas engine for iron and steel works, and he was also among the pioneers in the introduction of three-phase alternating current to iron and steel and allied works.

About 1903 Mr. Dixon gave up his contracting practice, and the firm's energies were devoted to consulting work. Among some of his achievements in this connection may be mentioned the complete electrification of the properties of the Ebbw Vale Steel, Iron and Coal Co., Ltd., with which he was connected for over 20 years, during which period the scheme grew from quite small dimensions to an installation consisting of three or four large power stations, with a total equipment of over 30 000 kW.

He was also responsible for the electrical equipment of the Rothesay Dock, belonging to the trustees of the Clyde Navigation, which was the first dock in this country to be electrified completely, and embodied, many features which had not previously been undertaken in any part of the world. Mr. Dixon's interests were varied, and, apart from his business, he was actively interested in numerous learned societies to which he contributed many papers.

He was a Past-President of the West of Scotland Iron and Steel Institute, and at the time of his death was President of the Glasgow and West of Scotland Branch of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers.

He was elected a Member of the Institution of Electrical Engineers in 1898.


1926 Obituary [3]

WALTER DIXON died on July 12, 1926.

He was born in Hull in 1861, and on completion of his education he commenced his engineering career with Messrs. Amos and Smith, Ltd., of that city. He then joined the firm of Messrs. Richard Thornby & Sons, Ltd., Grantham, and was entrusted with the supervision of important contracts in London and other places.

In 1891 he removed to Glasgow, where he became associated with Mr. M. B. Mountain, representative of Messrs. Ernest Scott and Mountain, Electrical Engineers, Newcastle, and he afterwards established himself in business under the name of Walter Dixon & Co., Electrical Contractors, Glasgow, and assisted the late Mr. James Riley in the development of the blast-furnace gas-engine. He carried out many important schemes for the electrification of iron and steel works, and was a pioneer in the introduction of three-phase alternating-current.

About 1903 he gave up his contracting practice, and devoted himself to consulting work. Among Mr. Dixon's achievements in this connection may be mentioned the complete electrification of the works and mines of the Ebbw Vale Steel, Iron, and Coal Co., Ltd., to whom he acted as adviser for over twenty years. He was also responsible for the electrical equipment of the Rothesay Dock belonging to the Trustees of the Clyde Navigation. This was the first dock in Great Britain to be electrified completely, and the installation embodied many entirely new features. Mr. Dixon's interests were many and varied.

He travelled largely, and apart from his business he was actively interested in numerous learned societies, to which he contributed many papers. He had been a president of the West of Scotland Iron and Steel Institute, and during his term of office in that capacity he took an active part in promoting research for the improvement of the puddling process.

He was elected a member of the Iron and Steel Institute in 1897, and was a constant attendant at its meetings, frequently taking part in the discussions.


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