Grace's Guide

British Industrial History

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 130,446 pages of information and 207,436 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Vauxhall: Cars

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1903. Vauxhall 5hp. Reg No: A 719.
July 1903.
November 1903.
November 1903.
May 1904.
February 1905. 7 h.p.
February 1905.
June 1905.
September 1905.
September 1905.
1905
1906 Q4.
1906 Q4.
1906. 14 h.p. car.
1906. 18 h.p. car.
‎‎
1906. 4 Cylinder Chassis.
‎‎
1906. Plan of Chassis.
1906. 9 h.p. chassis.
1906. 9 h.p. chassis.
1906. 18 h.p. chassis.
1906. 18 h.p. chassis.
‎‎
1906.Crank Chamber of Engine
1908. Vauxhall 12-16 hp. Body by G. S. Palmer and Son.
November 1908. 20 h.p. monobloc engine.
November 1908. 20 h.p. detail.
July 1908.
July 1908. 20 h.p.
November 1909.
November 1909.
July 1910.
July 1910.
July 1910.
June 1911. 20-hp with bodywork by Mulliner.
1914.
Advert in French. 50 h.p.
March 1922.
1922.
June 1923.
November 1927.
c1930. Vauxhall Mascot (Right Side View).
c1930. Vauxhall Mascot (Left Side View).
c1930. Vauxhall Mascot (Front View).
c1930. Vauxhall Mascot (Back View).
October 1931.
November 1933.
November 1933.
December 1933.
January 1934.
1934. Vauxhall 14/6. Exhibit at the Atwell-Wilson Motor Museum.
April 1935.
May 1935.
August 1935.
January 1936.
January 1936.
January 1936.
October 1936.
October 1936.
1936. Vauxhall Stratford Tourer. 14.6 hp. Reg No: CAF 567.
1936. Vauxhall 14 Saloon. Reg No: CHU 101.
1936. Vauxhall 14 Saloon. Reg No: CHU 101.
1936. Vauxhall 14 DX Tickford. Possibly the only one manufactured. Reg No: 711 UXG.
Reg No: HPG 31.
1937. Vauxhall DX. Reg No: ABE 197.
1937. Vauxhall DX. Reg No: ABE 197.
1938.
Reg No: JN 8055.
April 1940.
Reg No: BRR 355.
1946.
May 1949.
October 1954.
October 1957.
Oct 1960.
December 1960.
18th March 1961.
November 1963.
Im20090412-Vauxhall.jpg
Im090504-Vauxhall.jpg
1966. Exhibit at the Atwell-Wilson Motor Museum.
October 1962. Vauxhall Velox / Cresta. LHS page.
October 1962. Vauxhall Velox / Cresta. RHS page.
1972. VX 4/90. Reg No: DBT 850L.
October 1973.
VX 4/90. Reg No: 698 SBF.

Note: This is a sub-section of Vauxhall

1903 The company built its first car, a five-horsepower model steered using a tiller, with two forward gears and no reverse gear. This led to a better design which was made available for sale. The car was designed by F. W. Hodges and sold for £150.

1904 November. Details of the 12-14hp three-cylinder car.[1][2]

1905 January. Details of the 7hp three-cylinder car.[3]

1905 August. Details of the T.T. car and about its six-speed gear.[4][5]

1905 Produced 9 h.p., 14 h.p. and 18 h.p. models. Listed as the Vauxhall and West Hydraulic Engineering Co of Luton. [6]

1908 February. Details of their 12-16hp car.[7][8][9]

1908 August. Announced the A-Type 20hp and in 1909 it cost £465 with a 3-litre four-cylinder engine.

1908 Announced the B-Type 16hp and 150 of these were produced over three years

1908 November. Details of the 20-hp car shown at Olympia.[10]

1908 November. Details of the 16-hp and 20-hp cars.[11]

1909 November. Details of the 27-hp six-cylinder car.[12]

1910 October. Details of the 30hp car.[13]

1911 October. Details of the 20hp (4), 30hp (6) and Prince Henry.[14]

1911 Introduced the C-Type, the 'Prince Henry', a sports model, priced at £485 for the chassis.

1912 Introduced the D-Type 25hp at £465 (chassis) and the A-Type was re=launched as the 16-20hp at £375

1912 October. Details of four models for next year: 16-20hp (4), 25hp (4), 35hp (6) and the Prince Henry (4).[15]

1913 Introduced the E-Type 30-98hp 4.5-litre engine model in limited production and mainly used in competition

1913 April. Advert for the new 25hp 4-cylinder model. [16]

1913 September. Details of the three-litre cars.[17]

1913 November. Little change for cars next year. 16-20hp, 25hp, Prince Henry 25hp, and the 35hp (6).[18]

1913-1917 For a list of the models and prices see the 1917 Red Book

1914 May. Details of the GP car.[19]

1914 August. Details of the 36-hp six-cylinder car.[20]

WWI Produced the 25-hp Staff car.

1920 November. Exhibited at the Motor Car Show at Olympia and the White City with a 22.4hp car. [21]

1927 Vauxhall selling several demonstration cars including Bedford Saloon Cars and Princeton Touring Cars. [22]

1927 Introduced the 20-60 model.

c1927-1930 The Vauxhall Mascot was a Griffin (or "Speedbird") (see pictured) was illustrated on a car around this time. The maker's name was stamped either 'Joseph Fray Ltd.' or Elkington Birmingham. It was bronze, nickel plated and at a height of 90mm.[23]

1929 Introduced the T-Type - a new version of the 20-60. T75 had a 75mm bore engine.

1930 October The T80 launched

1930 Bedford, a subsidiary constructing commercial vehicles, was established as the Stock Market Crash of 1929 had made importing American lorries uneconomical.

1931 Introduced the 'Cadet'. This was the first car to have a synchromesh gear-box.

1933 Introduced the 'Light Six' model with 'no-draught' ventilation.

1938 Introduced the 'Ten'.

After the war, car production resumed but models were designed as a more mass-market product leading to expansion of the company. They commenced with the 10, 12 and 14-hp models based on the pre-war designs.

1948 Introduced the 12-hp Wyvern and the 18-hp Velox together.

1951 Exhibitor at the 1951 Motor Show in the Car Section.

1961 Manufacturers of motor cars, including the "Cresta", "Velox", "Victor" and "Bedford" commercial vehicles. Also manufacture spare parts. 26,520 employees.

1960s During the 1960s Vauxhall acquired a reputation for making rust-prone models, though in this respect most manufacturers were equally bad. The corrosion protection built into models was tightened up significantly, but the reputation dogged the company until the early 1980s.

1961 Listed as a subsidiary of general Motors Corporation. Employ 26,250 persons. Manufacture Cresta, Velox, Victor and Bedford vehicles. [24]

1963 Motor Show exhibitor. Showed Viva, Victor, VX 4/90, Cresta and Velox. [25]

Early Registrations

List of Models

  • 10-4 (1937–1947)
  • Vauxhall: 12-4 (I-type) 1937–46
  • Vauxhall: 14-6 (J-type) 1939–48
  • 14 and 14/40 (1922–1927)
  • 20/60 (1927–1930)
  • 23/60 (1922–1926)
  • 25 (1937–1940)
  • 25/70 (1926–1928)
  • Agila (2000-present)
  • Albany
  • Astra (1980-present)
  • Belmont (1986-1991)
  • Frontera (1991–2004, rebadged Isuzu MU Wizard)
  • Insignia (2008-present)
  • Magnum (1973-1978)
  • Monaro (2001–2005)
  • Monterey (1994–1999, rebadged Isuzu Trooper)
  • Meriva (2002-present)
  • Nova (1983-1993)
  • Omega (1994-2003)
  • Royale (1978-1986), rebadged Opel Senator
  • Senator (1978-1994)
  • Signum (2003-2008)
  • Silver Aero (1983 concept)
  • Silver Bullet (1976 concept)
  • Six (1933–1938)
  • SRV (1970 concept)
  • T and T80 (1930–1932)
  • Tigra (1994-present)
  • Vectra (1995-present)
  • Ventora (1968–1972)
  • Viceroy (1978-1982), rebadged Opel Commodore
  • Viscount (1966–1972)
  • VX220 (2001-2005)
  • VX4/90 (1961–1972)
  • VX Lightning (limited edition VX220)
  • Wyvern (1948–1957)

See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. The Autocar 1904/11/12
  2. The Autocar 1904/11/19
  3. The Autocar 1905/01/14
  4. The Autocar 1905/08/26
  5. The Autocar 1905/09/09
  6. The Automobile Vol. III. Edited by Paul N. Hasluck and published by Cassell and Co in 1906.
  7. Automotor Journal 1908/02/22
  8. Automotor Journal 1908/02/29
  9. Automotor Journal 1908/03/07
  10. Automotor Journal 1908/11/28
  11. The Autocar 1908/11/07
  12. The Autocar 1909/11/13
  13. The Autocar 1910/10/22
  14. The Autocar 1911/10/21
  15. The Autocar 1912/11/02
  16. The Autocar 1913/04/05
  17. The Autocar 1913/09/06
  18. The Autocar 1913/11/08
  19. The Autocar 1914/05/23
  20. The Autocar 1914/08/01
  21. The Engineer 1920/11/19 p498
  22. The Times, Tuesday, Mar 29, 1927
  23. 'Automotive Mascots - A Collector's Guide to British Marque, Corporate and Accessory Mascots by David Kay and Lynda Springate.'
  24. 1961 Guide to Key British Enterprises: Motor, Motor-Cycle and Commercial Vehicle Manufacturers
  25. 1963 Motor Show