Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

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Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 163,411 pages of information and 245,908 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Vale House Mill, Glossop

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or Valehouse Mill, Tintwistle, near Glossop.

Built 1795. Occupied by John and Robert Thornley [1]

1827 Advertisement: 'BANKRUPT'S PROPERTY EXEMPT from DUTY. TO BE SOLD~BY AUCTION, (Peremptorily) unless previously disposed of by Private Contract, of which due notice will be given, at the house of Joseph Oates, sign of the Norfolk Arms, in Glossop, on Wednesday, April 11th, 1827, at the hour of three o'clock the afternoon, subject to such conditions as will be then produced , Inheritance in Fee Simple of and in all that capital MESSUAGE, called Vale House, with the attached and detached Offices, consisting of coach-house, stable, and granary, situate in Tintwistle, in the county of Chester, late in the occupation of Mr. Robert Thornley. And also of and in all those TWO FACTORIES, situate Tintwistle aforesaid, also lately occupied by the said Robert Thornley. And also of and in TWO BARNS, and TWENTY-ONE COTTAGES, near and adjoining to the said Factories, which Cottages recently produced rental of £126. per annum. The whole of the Buildings are of Stone, and in excellent repair. The Dwelling-house and Out-building are replete with conveniences. The dining-room is 26 feet long, 1,1 feet broad the drawing and breakfast-rooms are each feet square There are six lodging-rooms, besides servants' bed-rooms; and the kitchen and back kitchen are completely fitted up, and abundantly supplied with water from soft water springs, that a small wheel employed to turn the jacks in the kitchen. An extensive GARDEN, well stocked with shrubs, exotic plants, and fruit-trees, is attached to the house has a south aspect, and is completely sheltered from the north winds. The House is situated about the centre of the dale or valley and the views from the dining and breakfast-rooms, up and down the vale, commanding die fine woods of the Earl of Dysart, are not equalled by any other in the country. The larger factory is five stories high, besides the attic, and presents a front of 105 feet 9 inches, the width is 39 feet 6 inches. The smaller Factory is three stories high, 117 feet long, and 33 feet wide, and both are capable of containing 15,000 spindles, with every requisite preparation. The Machinery is turned by a powerful Waterwheel of eighteen feet in diameter, and four yards width, built by Mr. T. C. Hewes, a few years since. The Factories are heated by Steam, and Lighted with Gas, the apparatus for which was only finished last winter. The fall of water is nineteen feet six inches, and supplied by the river Etherow, a never-failing stream—Hands are plentiful, and coal is obtained at a cheap rate and great abundance.' [2]

See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. [1]List of mills in Longdendale and Glossopdale
  2. Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser, 24th March 1827