Grace's Guide

British Industrial History

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Tungstone Products

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Advertising Sign.
April 1959.

Tungstone Accumulator Co, of Salisbury Sq, Fleet St, London

Pre-WWI Walter Haddon discovered a material he called "Tungstone", which was described as the "next hardest thing to metal", which he used for making the frames and furniture for the standardized type which his firm, John Haddon and Co supplied to the printing trade.

1925 Introduction of a design of accumulator, using plates made from pure lead (rather than a lead-antimony alloy) and replacing the wood widely used for spacers by a more durable material (presumably Tungstone)[1]

1925 Tungstone accumulators were entirely manufactured by machines[2]

1925 Walter Haddon of London patented a design of accumulator casing and, with James McDonald Burnett of Weston by Welland, patented a design of plate/grid for accumulators

1928 Accumulators were made at the Tungstone High-Pressure Die Casting Works at Market Harborough[3]

1938 Private company formed: Tungstone Products.

1953 Became part of Haddon Group

1962 Tungstone Products Ltd, part of the Haddon Group, supplied stationary lead-acid cells and components for powering communications, to the General Post Office[4]

1963 Motor Show exhibitor. Batteries

1966 Haddon were acquired by London Merchant Securities

1984 Hawker Siddeley acquired its owner, Carlton Industries

By 1986 was part of Hawker Siddeley[5]

See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. The Times Apr 05, 1927
  2. The Times, Dec 23, 1925
  3. The Times, Sep 08, 1928
  4. The Times Aug 13, 1962
  5. The Times, March 25, 1986