Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

Registered UK Charity (No. 115342)

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

T. C. Greensmith and Co

From Graces Guide
Advertising sign.

of Hilton Mills, nr Derby

of Newton-road. Burton-on-Trent

Flour millers and corn merchants

See Charles Greensmith and his son Thomas Charles Greensmith

Founded by Lawrence Greensmith, who took the old abbey mills at Darley Abbey from the late Mr. Samuel Evans, an old school companion. Later Lawrence Greensmith's son, Charles Greensmith, removed the milling business to Nottingham road mill and his son Thomas Charles Greensmith removed first to Hilton Mill and then the present mill at Burton. At Burton, the business was carried on at the ancient mill picturesquely situated on the east bank of the Trent to the north of the town. This was over thirty years ago (c.1890), and he greatly extended the business in 1899 by building a flour mill, a modern structure of five stories The old, substantially built corn mill, which experienced a new and flourishing period of activity under Mr. Greensmith's well-directed energy, has a history which goes back to many centuries being mentioned in the Doomsday book. The present building dates from 1745 and occupies the site of a large grist mill, built by the Abbot Burton in the thirteenth century for grinding the malt used in brewing the conventual ale. One interesting feature is an ancient door heavily studded with square headed nails. After Mr. Greensmith had enlarged the mill to the growing requirements of his business he had it fitted with the latest machinery of an improved roller system. This made the capacity the mill very large and altogether it might be regarded a pattern mill of the period. Another instance of the enterprise which was a notable feature of Mr. Greensmith's control was readiness to adopt new methods, as shewn by the fact that over twenty years ago had the first steam lorry in the town. He was too, the originator of the old-fashioned farmhouse bread which he made to suit the late Sir Oswald Mosley, Bart. [1]

See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. Derbyshire Advertiser and Journal - Friday 15 September 1922