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British Industrial History

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Stephenson Yates Knight

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Stephenson Yates Knight (1875-1942)


1943 Obituary [1]

STEPHENSON YATES KNIGHT a son of the late John Peake Knight, for many years general manager of the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway, was born in 1875. After completing his general education at Neuenheim College, Heidelberg, and his technical training at the School of Practical Engineering, Crystal Palace, he served his apprenticeship under Mr. William Kirtley, the locomotive superintendent of the London, Chatham and Dover Railway and later, with the Westinghouse Brake Company.

He then gained practical experience with Messrs. Thomas Middleton and Company, general engineers, of Southwark, and in 1898 became a partner in the Viaduct Foundry and Engineering Company, Ltd., Crumlin, Monmouthshire. Four years later he went into business on his own account as part proprietor of the Llanwit Foundry, Pontypridd. In 1915 he received an appointment as Superintending Engineer, Eastern Division of London, in the Ministry of Munitions, and his work in that capacity was recognized in a special letter of thanks which he received from Mr. Churchill, then Minister of Munitions. Subsequently he served for a period in the Railway Operating Division of the Royal Engineers with the rank of lieutenant, but was later appointed officer in charge of all propeller factories north of the Thames.

After the war he transferred to the Royal Air Force. He subsequently acted as railways representative to The International Paint and Composition Company, Ltd., of Westminster. Mr. Knight was elected an Associate Member of the Institution in 1906. His death occurred on 15th October 1942.


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