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British Industrial History

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Staveley Iron and Chemical Co

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of Hollingwood

1948 Company formed, a subsidiary of Staveley Coal and Iron Co

1951 Nationalised under the Iron and Steel Act; became part of the Iron and Steel Corporation of Great Britain[1].

1953 The directors of the Staveley Coal and Iron Co, bruised by the lengthy negotiations for compensation from the National Coal Board for properties nationalised in 1948, decided not to buy the Staveley Iron and Chemical Co from the Holding and Realization Agency[2]. Subsidiary companies included:

1954 Acquired W. H. Smith and Co, electrical engineers of Manchester[3]

1960 The Staveley Iron and Chemical Co was sold by the Holding and Realization Agency to Stewarts and Lloyds Ltd for six million pounds[4] and merged with Stanton Iron Works Co to form Stanton and Staveley.

1961 Iron founders, producers of pig iron, manufacturers of sand spun, metal spun and vertically cast iron pipes and fittings, industrial acids, coal tar products, electrolytic products, light hydrocarbon oils, intermediates for dyestuffs and fine chemical manufacture, coke, wood wool, bricks, producers of moulding sand, ganister, ironstone mine owners. 5,000 employees. [5]

By 1966 name had been changed to Staveley Industries; acquired Craven Brothers but it was losing money[6]


See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. Hansard 19 February 1951
  2. The Times, 16 December 1953
  3. The Times, Dec 02, 1954
  4. The Times, 13 September 1960
  5. 1961 Dun and Bradstreet KBE
  6. The Times, Jan 13, 1966