Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

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Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 163,372 pages of information and 245,906 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Speymouth Viaduct, Garmouth

From Graces Guide

Built 1883-86 for the Great North of Scotland Railway. Now part of Moray District Speyside Walk

950 ft long overall, having an impressive 350 ft bowstring span and six approach spans. Designed by Blyth and Cunningham and Patrick Moir Barnett. Ironwork by Blaikie Brothers of Aberdeen. Contractor for foundations and masonry: John Fyfe and Co, Kemnay.[1]

1885 'THE SPEY BRIDGE AT GARMOUTH. The new railway bridge over the river Spey near Garmouth, which will connect Elgin directly with Aberdeen and the coast towns on the Moray Firth, is making rapid progreea. The bridge, as may be remembered, is built on dry land, the intention being to divert the river and embank the old bed. The main span of the bridge is constrncted on the bowstring girder principle, and measures 350 feet, Thera are three hundred [feet] spans on each side, making a total waterway of 950 feet. The smaller spans are of the lattice girder type. The main span has 19 uprights, measuring 43 feet in the centre, en each side, which are strengthened by what are termed "stiffeners" or tiers, about three-quarters up, while a main boom runs along both the top and the bottom of it. This span which, it may mentioned, is the longest of its kind in Britain — that over the Menai Straits being a tubular one — is perfect in its workmanship and substantiality. All the iron work rests upon strong, massive piers, which are either founded upon rock or strongly grounded upon concrete. These piers, of which there are eight sets, are topped with splendid close-grained blocks from the Corrennie Quarries in Aberdeenshire ; the blocks weigh each about five tons. The protection wall, which extends over the total breadth of the smaller piers, and leaves only the main pier free, so that the river may be forced into its proper bed, is being extended over the present channel of the river on the one side, and over a considerable distance on the other. In about three weeks it is expected that the western portion of the wall will be finished, and as soon thereafter as possible the diversion of the Spey will be commenced. In this operation a great deal will depend upon the weather and the size of the river, but should the contractors be favoured with anything like the weather which they have all along experienced since the commencement of this gigantic undertaking, the work will no doubt be speedily and effectively done. This part of the work comes under Mr Fyfe’s contract, the iron work being contracted for Messrs Blaikie Brothers, Aberdeen. There are at present six steam cranes at work, of which five are in connection with the iron work, besides a great quantity of other expensive plant. What forcibly strikes a visitor is the extraordinary quietness and order with which everything is carried on; in fact, one scarcely hears the sound of hammer. The use of the rivetter's hammer is replaced to great extent by the patent hydraulic rivetter. When this large undertaking may be finished is question which cannot readily answered, but the works, under the efficient superintendence of Mr Booth, are meantime being expeditiously pushed forward, and every effort will be put forth to finish the bridge at as early a date as possible. It may added that several photographs and paintings have already been taken of the bridge.' [2]

See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. [1] HistoricBridges.org: Speymouth Railway Viaduct
  2. Aberdeen Free Press - Thursday 16 July 1885