Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

Registered UK Charity (No. 115342)

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 149,644 pages of information and 235,472 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Shrewsbury and Chester Railway

From Graces Guide
1846.

The Shrewsbury to Chester Line, also known as the Severn - Dee Line (after the rivers on which Shrewsbury and Chester stand), was built in 1846 as the Shrewsbury and Chester Railway. The engineer for the line was Henry Robertson while the contractor was Thomas Brassey in partnership with William Mackenzie and Robert Stephenson[1] - presumably Brassey, Mackenzie and Stephenson.

1847 An accident occurred to one of the company's trains crossing the River Dee on the Chester and Holyhead Railway, when the cast iron girder bridge collapsed, depositing some coaches of the train into the river, killing 5 people[2]. Robert Stephenson, the designer, was chief engineer of the Chester and Holyhead Railway; the engineer for the Chester and Shrewsbury company was Henry Robertson[3]. The design of the trussed girder bridge was ill-conceived. The failure belatedly drew attention to the wider dangers inherent in cast iron girder bridges. A subsequent Royal Commission, which reported in 1849, condemned the design and the use of trussed cast iron in railway bridges. See Wikipedia.

The railway became part of the Great Western Railway's main line from London Paddington to Birkenhead Woodside until nationalisation when it was part of the Western Region until later transferred to the London Midland Region of British Railways. It runs from Shrewsbury to Chester. Of the intermediate stations, Gobowen is in England but the remainder are in Wales.


See Also

Loading...

Sources of Information

  1. The Wikipedia source page suggests this might not be the case, ie that Robert Stephenson was not a contractor for the line but a different Stephenson, John
  2. The Times May 26, 1847
  3. The Times June 3 1847

[1] Wikipedia