Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

Registered UK Charity (No. 115342)

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 163,367 pages of information and 245,906 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Trent Navigation

From Graces Guide
(Redirected from River Trent Navigation)
1907. Canals in the Trent and Ouse districts.
1955. Gunthorpe Pipe Bridge.

An Act was passed in 1699 to keep the Trent navigable, but works only made a real impact around 1783 when the Trent Navigation Co obtained an Act authorising them to improve the river section from Shardlow to Gainsborough.

1794 an Act allowed the construction of locks and weirs.

The Trent Navigation Companies developed facilities for transport

Nottingham Corporation, sensing the threat of losing control to the prejudice of the community, sought to restrain the issue of powers to the Companies, even opposing their applications to Parliament.

Both sides, Corporation and companies, realising the nature of the hygienic, economic, industrial and political problems then maturing and the futility of conflict, joined forces in an effort to achieve success.

1906 an Act was passed to permit the construction of 6 large locks and weirs but only 1 lock was completed until the Trent Navigation Co acquired a section of river and completed the remaining 5.

Holme Lock (after 100 years use), being of inadequate depth and defective construction, was replaced by a new lock; three additional locks and weirs were constructed at Stoke Bardolph, Gunthorpe, and Hazleford on the lower, faster flowing part of the river; a further new lock replaced the old Newark Nether Lock. All these locks were made to the same dimensions as that at Cromwell, the object being to pass a tug and train of boats at one time.

1947 under the Transport Act the Trent Navigation was taken over by the British Transport Commission.

See Also

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Sources of Information

  • [1] Nedias newsletter #78
  • [2] Nedias newsletter #80