Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

Registered UK Charity (No. 115342)

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Renold and Coventry Chain Co:1935 Review

From Graces Guide

Note: This is a sub-section of Renold and Coventry Chain Co

Visit of the Iron and Steel Institute to the Iron, Steel and Engineering Industries of Manchester and District

The Renold and Coventry Chain Company Limited. Head Offices RENOLD WORKS, DIDSBURY, MANCHESTER.

This combine with an issued capital of £1,184,656 was formed in 1930 of:-

The total number of employees in the works at Manchester, Coventry and Birmingham is 4,500.

The selling organisation covers every commercial and industrial country in the world through subsidiary companies, branch offices or agencies.

The firm's products include:

Precision chains for general industrial power transmission, and the wheels on which they operate: accessories to the above — clutches, flexible couplings, chain cases, lubricating devices, etc driving chains for bicycles, motor cycles, automobile and diesel engine camshafts: bicycle components and accessories—pedals, hubs, lugs, ball bearing cups and cones, free wheels, etc.: conveyor chains and attachments: cutting chains and accessories.

The markets in which the Company operates demand a low price level, both on grounds of competition (over one-third of the product is exported) and because the growth of the field has depended on a continuous process of cost reduction. (Sterling prices are now about 85-90% of pre-war).

The low price level is achieved by a high degree of mechanisation applied to mass production of standardised parts necessitating continuous operation of machines with minimum changing, and by economy of material.


See Also

Loading...

Sources of Information