Grace's Guide

British Industrial History

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Newage

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1935 Northern Electric Wireless And General Engineering Company was founded in Manchester to manufacture generator sets and air compressors

Subsequently the initials were used to form a shorter name, Newage Engineers

1948 Acquired Arthur Lyon and Co of London[1]

1950 Newage Engineers acquired Stamford Electrical and transferred Arthur Lyon and Co generator business to Barnack Road, Stamford.

1964 Taken-over by Charterhouse Group[2]

1965 Arthur Lyon Ltd and Newage (Manchester) Ltd consolidated all generator production at Barnack Road. Company renamed Newage Lyon Ltd.

1966 P. R. Motors was acquired by the Charterhouse Group through its subsidiary, Newage Engineers Ltd.

1967 Newage Lyon produced the world’s first brushless alternator

Manufacturers of alternators and electrical equipment; marine and industrial engine converters. Owned a main dealer for Ford, H. E. Nunn in Salford and parts of Manchester, and Newage-Lyon of Stamford, maker of electric generators[3]

1970 Newage Engineers acquired Propulsion, maker of marine sterngear and propulsion systems; formed 2 divisions:

  • Transmissions (marine and off-road vehicles)
  • Electrical and Pumps, including Alcon and Stamford alternators[4].

P. R. Motors became part of the Transmissions Division.

1974 Transmissions Division continued to prosper; to cater for the increased demand for its existing products and its projected expansion into related transmissions products, a new factory was purpose-built at Barlow Road.

The company built a very close partnership with its customer base which led to the company being the preferred source of drive axles and gearboxes for the British dumper industry. As well as other vehicles produced in the U.K., France, Germany, Switzerland, Austria and other countries. This has resulted in a steady stream of new and improved transmissions, both standard products such as 40M and 85M gearboxes, as well as dedicated products to meet specific customer requirements.

This close relationship with the dumper industry led Newage to acquire Gear Drive Systems in 1975 and develop a full range of double reduction axles with totally enclosed oil immersed brakes specifically for their needs, although the range was later broadened to general off-highway applications. The same criteria for reliability for which the company's gearboxes are so well known was applied to the range of axles.

1977 Expansion of Electrical Division (factories at Stamford and Peterborough) which claimed to be largest maker of generators up to 850kVA in Europe[5]

1979 The last generators using slip-rings were produced.

1980 The Electrical Division won the Queen's Award for Export[6]

1980 The divisional structure was disbanded - P. R. Motors re-acquired the business of the Transmissions Division and was renamed Newage Transmissions Limited. The Electrical Division continued to be known as Newage Engineers.

1984 Onan Corporation acquired the alternator business of Newage Engineers Ltd.

1986 Cummins Engine Company Inc acquired Cooper Industries' holding in Onan Corporation and became the majority owner of Newage.

1992 Cummins acquired the remaining shares of Onan Corporation from Hawker Siddeley Group.

2001 Newage and AVK SEG of Germany combined.

2006 Newage AvK SEG changed its name to Cummins Generator Technologies


Company Names

Transmissions:

  • Newage (Manchester) Ltd
  • Newage Engineering Ltd
  • Newage Transmissions Ltd
  • Newage PRM Ltd
  • PRM Marine Ltd

Generator Business:

  • Newage Stamford Ltd
  • Newage AVK SEG Ltd
  • Cummins Generator Technologies


See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. Cummins Generators [1]
  2. The Times, Nov 24, 1964
  3. The Times, Mar 08, 1968
  4. The Times, Sep 02, 1970
  5. The Times, May 09, 1977
  6. The Times, Apr 21, 1980