Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

Registered UK Charity (No. 115342)

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 163,176 pages of information and 245,641 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Middlesbrough Transporter Bridge

From Graces Guide
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Ferry Road, Middlesbrough, Tees Valley, TS2 1PL.

Following a 1907 Act of Parliament the bridge was built at a cost of £68,026 6s 8d, by William Arrol and Co of Glasgow to replace an earlier steam ferry. A transporter bridge was chosen because Parliament ruled that the new scheme of crossing the river had to avoid affecting the river navigation.

1906 Cleveland Bridge and Engineering Co were appointed to act as the advising engineers to the Middlesbrough Corporation. The Cleveland Bridge Company agreed to prepare plans and specifications to be used by the Corporation when seeking parliamentary powers.

The bridge was designed by Georges Camille Imbault, and is of a double cantilever truss type which is unique in transporter bridges.

1907 of the 6 tenders received, the lowest was by William Arrol and Co and this was selected.

1909 Construction started

1911 Formally opened on 17th October 1911 by His Royal Highness Prince Arthur of Connaught. [1]

See here for the findings of a recent analysis to compare and contrast the design and behaviour of the Middlesbrough and Newport transporter bridges. [2]

Note: In 1873 Charles Smith of T. Richardson and Sons, Hartlepool, proposed and designed a transporter bridge, which he called a 'bridge ferry', to cross the River Tees between Middlesbrough and Port Clarence. It was not constructed, but it bore a superficial resemblance to the present Middlesbrough Transporter Bridge. It would be twenty years before the first transporter bridge was opened - the Viscaya Transporter Bridge.


See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. The Engineer 1911/09/29, p 336
  2. [1] Wind loads on open truss structures: applications of blockage to historic transporter bridges by A. J. Carter, P. H. Taylor, H. Santo, A. Blakeborough. Published:19 August 2019