Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

Registered UK Charity (No. 115342)

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Marcus Charles Inman Hunter

From Graces Guide

Marcus Charles Inman Hunter (1882-1949), designer of the Cheswold car

1882 May 23rd. Born the son of Benjamin Hunter, Vicar of Alkborough, Lincs., and his wife Francis

1909 Married in Doncaster to Edith Holmes

1911 Living at 24 Kingsley Road, Bedford: Marcus Charles Inman Hunter (age 28 born Carlton, Nott), Automobile Engineer Draughtsman for Automobile and Electrical Engineers. With his wife Edith Emily Hunter (age 26 born Knighton, Radn.) and their daughter Sheila Hunter (age under one month). Also his Mother-in-law Mary Ellen Cornelius (age 54 born Bedford).[1]

1914 Birth of son Edward Marcus Hunter

1939 Living at 12 Fairfield Avenue, Twickenham, Designer Engineer Electrical work. With his wife Edith E. Hunter.[2]

1948 Published 'Rotary Valve Engines - a Practical Treatise on the Principles of Rotary Valves, with Examples of Application to the Early Gas Engine, the Steam Engine, and to Modern Petrol Motors'


1950 Obituary [3]

"MARCUS CHARLES INMAN HUNTER, who was born in 1882, received his general education at Rugby Lower School and his technical training at Doncaster Technical College. After serving a pupilage in the locomotive works of the Great Northern Railway at Doncaster from 1899 to 1903 he continued in the service of the company as a draughtsman for a further three years. He then joined the Adams Manufacturing Company, Ltd. (now the Igranic Electric Co), of Bedford, as a designer, subsequently becoming chief draughtsman and engineer with responsibility for the design of all the company's cars.

In 1912 he designed the Cheswold car. In 1915 he became assistant works manager at the Alexandria, N.B., works of Sir W. G. Armstrong Whitworth and Company, Ltd., and on the Admiralty taking over the establishment three years later was appointed works manager, continuing in full charge until the works were closed in 1920. Mr. Hunter joined the staff of the British Thomson-Houston, Ltd., at Willesden, in April 1923 and began a connection which lasted to the end of his active career.

His first position was that of mechanical designer, which was followed two years later by the post of mechanical engineer acting in an advisory capacity. In 1936 he became development engineer, and, finally, in 1944 he was appointed chief mechanical engineer. Amongst other engineering work, he was responsible for the design of the steel supporting structures for the outdoor switchgear of the North Eastern section of the Central Electricity Board supply system. He was well known in the automobile world for his rotary valve engine, and as author of a standard work on the subject, entitled "Rotary Valve Engines". Mr. Hunter, whose death occurred on 11th August 1949, was elected a Member of the Institution in 1938."


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