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Kenneth Fraser

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Kenneth Fraser (1874-1941), managing director of the Yorkshire Copper Works


1941 Obituary [1]

KENNETH FRASER had a distinguished career in the non-ferrous metals industry. He was born at Stockton-on-Tees in 1874, and in 1890 commenced his training for a commercial career with the Stockton Malleable Iron Company, Ltd., for whom he was chiefly engaged in the accounting and costs departments. From 1897 to 1907 he held appointments with Messrs. Elliott's Metal Company, Ltd., in Birmingham and later at Pembrey, South Wales, where he was placed in charge of the smelting works.

In 1907 he went to Leeds and became general manager of the Yorkshire Copper Works, Ltd., being responsible for the works engaged in the production of non-ferrous tubes. He was appointed managing director in 1920 and later vice-chairman of the company, and retained that position up to the time of his death, which occurred on 17th February 1941.

Mr. Fraser was elected a Companion of the Institution in 1932 and was also an Associate of the Institution of Naval Architects. He was a Freeman of the City of London, a vice-president of the Federation of British Industries, and chairman of the Leeds and District Branch of the Federation. Moreover, he was an active Member of Council of the Leeds Chamber of Commerce and also served on the Empire and Foreign Trade Committee, and was also chairman of the Leeds National Savings Committee, to which he devoted much of his time and energy.


1941 Obituary [2]

Mr. Kenneth Fraser, Vice-Chairman and Managing Director of the Yorkshire Copper Works, Ltd., died at his home in Leeds on February 17, 1941.

Kenneth Fraser was born at Stockton-on-Tees in 1874 and educated at the Quaker School.

On leaving school he began his training with the Stockton Malleable Iron Co., Ltd., later merged in the South Durham Iron and Steel Co., Ltd.

After some years as manager of Elliott's Metal Co., Birmingham, and a short period in South Wales, he joined the Yorkshire Copper Works, Ltd., in 1907 as general manager. His work took him over both North and South America as well as Europe, and in addition Fraser found time to take part in national affairs.

He was Vice-President of the Federation of British Industries, Chairman of the Leeds branch of the Federation, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, and a Freeman of the City of London.

When war broke out Fraser devoted his energies towards furthering the national effort, and the extra strain brought on by his work on behalf of the National Savings movement and the War Weapons campaign in Leeds contributed to his early death.

Fraser was an original member of the Institute of Metals.


1941 Obituary [3]

The non-ferrous metals industry has sustained a severe loss by the death on Monday last at his home, Tregullow, Oakwood, Leeds, of Kenneth Fraser, the vice-chairman and managing director of the Yorkshire Copper Works, Ltd., of Leeds.

Kenneth Fraser was born at Stockton-on-Tees in 1874, and received his education at the Quaker School in that town. On leaving school he began his training for a commercial career with the Stockton Malleable Iron Company, Ltd., which, at a later date, became part of the South Durham Iron and Steel Company, Ltd. Some years later, at the invitation of Mr. Neville Chamberlain, the late Prime Minister, he went to Birmingham to take part in the management of Elliott’s Metal Co at Selly Oak, Birmingham. After spending a period in South Wales he took up his appointment in 1907 with the Yorkshire Copper Works, Ltd. He travelled widely and knew intimately both North and South America and the Continent of Europe. Apart from his local interests, Mr. Fraser found time to take part in national affairs, and he was vice-president of the Federation of British Industries, and chairman of the Leeds and District Branch of the Federation.

He was a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, a Freeman of the City of London, and an associate of the Institution of Naval Architects. During the war period he has been in constant touch with Ministerial and Service advisers, and he was chairman of the Leeds War Savings Committee and the Leeds War Weapons Campaign. He gave freely of his best to all these efforts, and would take no rest. During recent months he showed signs of exhaustion and collapsed at his home on Sunday morning last, and died in the early hours of Monday morning. His death at the comparatively early age of sixty-seven will be regretted deeply by his many friends, for it is recognised that his illness was directly caused by the prolonged strain to which he submitted himself on behalf of the nation’s war effort, both in connection with his business and the public work in which he was so interested."


See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. 1941 Institution of Mechanical Engineers: Obituaries
  2. 1941 Institute of Metals: Obituaries
  3. The Engineer 1941 Jan-Jun: Index