Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

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Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 149,713 pages of information and 235,473 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

John Henry Adams (1860-1915)

From Graces Guide

John Henry Adams (1860-1915)

1860 Born in London the son of William Adams


1916 Obituary [1]

JOHN HENRY ADAMS was born in London on 10th September 1860.

He was educated at Brighton Grammar School and Thanet College, Margate, and privately in Brussels.

He began his apprenticeship in 1877 at the Stratford Works of the Great Eastern Railway, under his father, the late William Adams; and when in 1879 his father became Locomotive Engineer of the London and South Western Railway, he was also transferred to that Company's works at Nine Elms.

Upon the completion of his training he served as a fireman for nine months, and afterwards was an engine-driver of goods and passenger trains for fifteen months on the London and South Western Railway.

He then spent a year with Messrs. Tannett, Walker and Co., of Leeds, to gain experience in hydraulics.

From July 1887 to September 1898 he was Locomotive, Carriage and Wagon Superintendent of the Donna Thereza Christina Railway, Brazil, and in January 1899 he became Assistant Manager of the South Eastern and Chatham Railway. Co.'s Locomotive Works.

In March 1902 he was appointed Locomotive, Carriage and Wagon Superintendent of the North Staffordshire Railway, a position which he held till his death.

He introduced many improvements in the locomotive and wagon stock of the North Staffordshire Railway. He fitted up all the tender axle-box bearings with a 100-inch lining of white anti-friction metal, and a lubricating pad in the bottom of the axle-box; he also introduced the four-wheeled bogie into engines and coaches, and from 1903 onward he built all his new engines and nearly all his new bogie carriages in the Works at Stoke, after reorganizing the Works and equipping them with up-to-date appliances and tools.

His death took place at Congleton, Cheshire, on 7th November 1915, at the age of fifty-five.

He was elected a Member of this Institution in 1902.


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