Grace's Guide

British Industrial History

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 125,733 pages of information and 196,442 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

James Parr and Co

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Im20121115-Parr.jpg
1884. Rear Hub of the Ordinary Bicycle's (Penny Farthing) unique 'Skeleton' hub.[1]
1884. Front Hub of the Ordinary Bicycle's (Penny Farthing) unique 'Skeleton' hub.[2]

1880 Listed as a Bicycle Manufacturer. 58 Navigation Street, Leicester. [3]

1881 Listed as a Bicycle Manufacturer. 58 and 62 Navigation Street, Leicester. [4]

1885 Company relocated to 61 Friar Lane, Leicester.

Their first bicycles named 'The Star' were very distinguishable ordinary bicycles with 'Skeleton' hubs and other advanced features for that time.

Early models featured a double thumb operated front roller brake, removable handlebars and extended rear forks allowing for a longer wheelbase eventually copied by other cycle makers towards the end of the ordinary era.

Several Ordinary bicycles (Penny Farthings) are known to have survived and more modern 1890 manufactured pneumatic tyre bicycles. One, also featuring a thumb operated brake, is in the National Cycle Collection.

The famous Racing Car Driver, Bob Gerard’s forefathers initially traded under the name of Parr’s Ltd, producing bicycles and even a car into the 1900’s. [5]


See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. Images kindly sent in by T. Pickering.
  2. Images kindly sent in by T. Pickering.
  3. 1880 Wright's Directory of Leicestershire and Rutland
  4. 1881 Kelly's Directory of Leicestershire and Rutland
  5. Tony Pickering