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British Industrial History

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Hulse and Co

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Hulse lathe at the National Slate Museum
Headstock of Hulse lathe at the National Slate Museum.
Exhibit at the National Slate Museum.
Exhibit at the National Slate Museum.
1887. Surfacing and Taper Turning Lathe.
1887.
1892.
1893. High speed milling machine.
1893.
1894. Quadruple geared duplex crank lathe.
1894.
1896.
1897.
1899.
1899.
1901.
1901.
1901.
1902. Planing Machine with Swivelling Cross Slide.
1903. Armour plate planing machine.
1903. Armour plate planing machine.
1903. Planer with swivelling cross slide.
1903. Planing machines for gas engine frames and curved surfaces.
1903. Portable planer.
1904. 12 inch high-speed headstock.
1904. 30 inch electrically driven lathe.
1905.
1906.
1907.
1907.
1907.
1907.
1907.
1909. Open-side planing machine.
1909. Plain cylindrical grinder.
1909. Planer type flat grinder.
1909. Locomotive link grinding machine.
1910.
1910.
1911.
1912.
1913.
1913.
1914. Universal horizontal boring machine.
1919.
1920.
1925.
1930. Railway carriage and wagon wheel lathe.

Hulse and Co of Salford, Manchester.

Also known as J. S. Hulse and Co

1852 Firm founded by Joseph Sykes Hulse.

1863 Listed as Joesph Sykes Hulse, Engineer and manufacturer of all kinds of engineers' tools, &c., Ordsal Works, Calder Street, Salford[1]

1881 J. S. Hulse retired and his brother William Wilson Hulse took charge.

Pre-1894 Lathe with 6' 6" dia faceplate and taking 14 ft between centres installed at J. I. Thornycroft's yard at Chiswick [2]

1894 Davies' Plural drilling machine for locomotive boilers. Article and illustration in 'The Engineer'

1894 Quadruple-geared duplex crank lathe for William Jessop and Son. Illustration.

1896 Hulse open-sided planing machine featured in the American Machinist, who credited the origin of the type to Richards of Manchester, but William Wilson Hulse wrote to the magazine to point out that he had patented it on 9 June 1865 (Pat. No. 1571) [3]

1900 Article and illustrations on their Belleville Boiler-Making Machinery

1911 Lathe for turning large turbine drums built for the Darlington Forge Co

1912 Description of an extension to their premises in The Engineer, which included two large new erecting shops [4]

1920 Large Crank-Shaft Turning Machine

1920 Were suppliers of machine tools

Hulse's Ordsall (Ordsal) Works was originally bounded by the River Irwell, Calder Street, Lower Seddon Street and the Regent Iron Works of Thomas Gadd. In c.1895 they took over the premises of the Regent Iron Works, which faced onto Regent Road.


See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. Slater's Directory of Manchester and Salford, 1863
  2. 'The Engineer' 23rd February 1894
  3. [1] American Machinist, 26 November 1896, p.1111
  4. The Engineer 1912/08/02