Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

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Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 162,869 pages of information and 245,382 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Henry Vaughan Lanchester

From Graces Guide

Henry Vaughan Lanchester (1863–1953) was an English architect working in London. He served as editor of The Builder, was a co-founder of the Town Planning Institute and a recipient of the Royal Gold Medal.

Lanchester was born in St John's Wood, London. His father, Henry Jones Lanchester (1816–1890), was an established architect, and his younger brother, Frederick W. Lanchester, was to become an engineer. He was articled to his father, but also worked in the offices of London architects F. J. Eadle, T. W. Cutler and George Sherrin from 1884-1894.

1871 Living at 21 Montpelier Place, Brighton: Henry J. Lanchester (age 37 born Islington), Architect and Surveyor. With his wife Octavia Lanchester (age 36 born St. James) and their children Henry Lanchester (age 7 born St. John's Wood); Mary Lanchester (age 6 born Lewisham); Ellen C. Lanchester (age 4 born Lewisham); Fredrick Lanchester (age 2 born Lewisham); and Frances Lanchester (age 8 Months born Brighton). Two visitors and four servants.[1]

1881 Living at 1 St. John's Terrace, Hove: Henry J. Lanchester (age 47 born Islington), Architect and Surveyor. With his wife Octavia Lanchester (age 46 born Piccadilly) and their children Henry V. Lanchester (age 19 born St. John's Wood), Architect Pupil; Mary Lanchester (age 16 born Lewisham); Frederick W. Lanchester (age 12 born Lewisham); Edith Lanchester (age 9 born Hove); Edward N. Lanchester (age 7 born Hove); and George H. Lanchester (age 6 born Hove). Three servants. [2]

1886 He studied at the Royal Academy won the Aldwinckle Prize and, in 1889, the Owen Jones Studentship.

1891 Living at 31 Lister's Avenue, Battersea: Henry J. Lanchester (age 57 born Islington), Architect and Surveyor. With his wife Octavia Lanchester (age 56 born St. James) and their children Henry V. Lanchester (age 27 born at St John's Wood), Architect; Eleanor C. Lanchester (age 24 born Lewisham), Fashion Artist; Frederick W. Lanchester (age 22 born Lewisham), Patentee; Francis Lanchester (age 20 born Brighton), Bank Clerk; Edith Lanchester (age 19 born Hove), Teacher in Training School; Edward M. Lanchester (age 17 born Hove), Auctioneer's Clerk. Three servants.[3]

His first architectural work was Kingswood House, Sydenham, in 1892, and he established his own practice in 1894.

His first fully independent work in 1896 were offices in Old Street, for Messrs Bovril Ltd. He formed a partnership in 1896 with James A. Stewart (1865 or 6-1908) and Edwin Alfred Rickards (1872–1920). As Lanchester, Stewart and Rickards, in 1897 the firm won the competition to build Cardiff City Hall.

Lanchester was editor of the Builder from 1910-12.

In 1912, he visited India and prepared a report on the planning of New Delhi as well as preparing plans for Madras.

In 1914 he was one of the founder members of the Town Planning Institute in London. He formed a new partnership in 1923, Lanchester, Lucas & Lodge, with Thomas Geoffry Lucas and Thomas Arthur Lodge.

He was appointed Professor of Architecture at University College London, and in 1934 Lanchester was awarded the Royal Gold Medal of the Royal Institute of British Architects.



See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. 1871 Census
  2. 1881 Census
  3. 1891 Census