Grace's Guide

British Industrial History

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 134,028 pages of information and 213,093 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Hallford

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February 1914. Hallford. One of four lorries for the Birkenhead Brewery Co.
February 1922. Hallford Spares
March 1930. Agents for Halleys Industrial Motors.

J. and E. Hall of Dartford Automobile Engineering Works produced commercial vehicles from 1906 under the name of Hallford (a combination of the company name and the location).

1906 Hallford produced a 25hp four-cylinder engine using Sauer patents

1907 Won Gold Medal for a 3 ton lorry awarded at RAC Commercial Motor Trials

1908 January. Details of their petrol-electric bus.[1][2]

1908 Showed a petrol-electric bus demonstrated at Coventry.

1909 Walter Gordon Wilson was asked to manage the motor department temporarily, which he did until 1911

1911 Producing own engines

WW1 Responsible for manufacture of a large number of chassis for Army lorries

1920 October. Exhibited at the Commercial Motor Exhibition at Olympia with a 5-ton tipping lorry

The company undertook many experiments with petrol-electric traction for Thomas Tilling which were later combined in vehicles built by Tilling-Stevens of Maidstone

1925 Withdrew from this market

Lorries
Built buses and trucks for sixteen years.

1923 Produced a rigid 10-ton six-wheeler

Buses
These early vehicles had chain drive, four speed gearboxes and Hall built engines.

Hallford provided chassis and engines for Hallford-Stevens petrol-electrics, who were a predecessor of Tilling-Stevens.

1925 The company ceased when wartime production only required lorries.

See Also

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Sources of Information

  • British Lorries 1900-1992 by S. W. Stevens-Stratten. Pub. Ian Allen Publishing
  • Buses and Trolleybuses before 1919 by David Kaye. Published 1972
  • The Engineer of 29th October 1920 p424
  • Ian Allan - British Buses Since 1900 - Aldridge and Morris