Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

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Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 150,664 pages of information and 235,203 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

George Watson Gray

From Graces Guide

George Watson Gray (c1863-1929)


1929 Obituary [1]

GEORGE WATSON GRAY died at Garston, near Liverpool, on February 12, 1929, at the age of sixty-six.

He commenced his chemical career in 1875 in the laboratory of Mr. John Pattinson of Newcastle, and at the Rutherford Technical College.

In 1883 he became assistant to Mr. A. Norman Tate at Liverpool, where he was in charge of a chemical laboratory, and also gave instruction to students.

In 1893 he established a successful consulting practice in Liverpool, in which he was joined in partnership in 1919 by Mr. James Smith and in 1923 by Mr. C. Durham Garbutt, and continued actively in the practice almost to the time of his death.

He made a special study of the analytical chemistry of the rarer elements used in the manufacture of alloy steels. Mr. Gray was the first to note the presence of calcium in high-grade ferro-silicon, and read papers on the subject before the Society of Chemical Industry and the Iron and Steel Institute. He also published details of a method for estimating and numerically expressing the colour in tanning materials and extracts, and a method for the estimation of phosphorus in the presence of tungsten.

He was elected a member of the Institute of Metals on March 13, 1918.


1929 Obituary [2]

GEORGE WATSON GRAY died at Garston, near Liverpool, on February 12,1929, aged sixty-six years.

He commenced his chemical career in 1875 in the laboratory of Mr. John Pattinson of Newcastle and at the Rutherford Technical College.

In 1883 he became assistant to Mr. A. Norman Tate at Liverpool, where he was in charge of a chemical laboratory and also gave instruction to students. In 1893 he established a successful consulting practice in Liverpool, in which he was joined in partnership in 1919 by Mr. James Smith, and in 1923 by Mr. C. Durham Garbutt, and continued actively in the practice almost to the time of his death.

He made a special study of the analytical chemistry of the rarer elements used in the manufacture of alloy steels. He was the first to note the presence of calcium in high-grade ferro- silicon, and read papers on the subject before the Society of Chemical Industry and the Iron and Steel Institute. He also published a method for estimating and numerically expressing the colour in tanning materials and extracts; and a method for the estimation of phosphorus in the presence of tungsten.

He was elected a member of the Iron and Steel Institute in 1901.


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