Grace's Guide

British Industrial History

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 142,278 pages of information and 227,857 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

George Bryant Britton

From Graces Guide

Jump to: navigation, search

George Bryant Britton (1857-1929) founder of G. B. Britton and Sons

1881 Living at 2 Byron Place, Bristol (age 23 born St. George), a Boot Manufacturer Employing 9 Men 10 Boys 6 Girls. With his wife Elizabeth (age 22 born St. George) and their son George E. (age 1 born St. George). Note: Living next door to his business partner George Jeffries [1]

1897 Britton was elected to Bristol City Council

1901 Living at Lodge Hill, Fishponds, Bristol (age 43 born Sty. George), Boot Maker and Employed. With his wife Elizabeth A. (age 42 born Kingswood) and their children George E. (age 21 born St. George), Boot Maker; Samuel W. (age 18 born St. George), Boot Maker; and Reginald (age 7 born Kingswood). Also two servants. [2]

1902 Living at Lodge Side, Sound Well Road, Two Mile Hill, Bristol [3]

1902 Married Annie, the daughter of John Henshaw

1918 Standing as a Coalition Liberal, Britton won the seat in Parliament

He served only one term in Parliament, and did not stand again at the 1922 general election.

1921 He was made an Alderman and served as Lord Mayor for the year 1920-1921. While Lord Mayor of Bristol, Britton led a deputation from the city to the Australian High Commissioner to urge the greater use of the port of Bristol for the importation of Australian produce. A strong advocate of tramways, he played an active part in the initiation of an electric tram service to Kingswood and also served as a Justice of the Peace.

1929 July 11th. Britton died at his home Lodge Side, Kingswood at the age of 66 years. He was survived by his wife Annie.


See Also

Loading...

Sources of Information

  1. 1881 Census
  2. 1901 census
  3. 1902 Kelly's Directory of Bristol