Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

Registered UK Charity (No. 115342)

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Geoffrey Hamilton Norman

From Graces Guide

Geoffrey Hamilton Norman (1882-1921)



1921 Obituary [1]

Squadron-Leader GEOFFREY HAMILTON NORMAN, R.A.F., was born in London on 9th June 1882.

He was educated at the Royal Academy, Gosport, and 1898 began his apprenticeship at Callender's Cable and Construction Co., Belvedere.

Three years later he studied at the Royal School of Mines, gaining the diploma in 1904.

In 1905 he went to New Zealand as assistant engineer on the Christchurch electric tramways, but returned in the following year.

In 1907 he was appointed assistant engineer in the mining department of the Egyptian Government. This department was closed in 1909, when Mr. Norman returned to London and was engaged in motor experimental work, until he joined the Forces in September 1914, first in the Naval Brigade which was followed by a Commission in the Royal Garrison Artillery.

He was transferred to the Royal Flying Corps and served as Flying Officer and Flight Commander on the Western Front for fourteen months before being wounded in action. He was twice mentioned in dispatches while in France. He devised a vane gun-sight, which bears his name, and for which he received an Award, and it was used by the R.A.F. to the end of the War.

He was next posted to the Experimental Air Station at Orfordness and was promoted to Squadron-Leader. Subsequently he was appointed Chief Experimental Officer in control of engine research at Farnborough, and devoted himself to the development of air-cooled cylinders, engine-starting systems, servo-motors for relay control of large machines, etc. He also carried out experiments for the reduction of fire-risk in aircraft.

His death took place after a short illness at Aldershot, on 18th August 1921, at the age of thirty-nine.

He became an Associate Member of this Institution in 1907.



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