Grace's Guide

British Industrial History

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GEC: Radio and Television

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1922. Crystal Detector Set No. 1. Exhibit at the Washford Radio Museum.
GECoPhone. 'Loud Speaking Amplifier'. Exhibit at the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh.
GECoPhone. 'Loud Speaking Amplifier'. Exhibit at the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh.
1922. Gecophone Crystal Radio Set No 2. Exhibit at Amberley Working Museum.
1923.
c1925. GECoPhone Crystal Radio set and Headphones. Exhibit at the Stephenson Railway Museum.
Radio. Exhibit at the Bakelite Museum.
Television. Exhibit at the Bakelite Museum.
1930s. Model MC3. Exhibit at Amberley Working Museum.
1930s. GEC Radio, General: Battery TRF3: Model BC3736
September 1933.
Late 1930s. GEC Valve Radio. Exhibit at the Stephenson Railway Museum.
1938. Model 3865. Exhibit at Amberley Working Museum.
GECoPhone.
GECoPhone (detail).
1949. Television. Exhibit at Coventry Museum.
1947-c1960. GEC Model BRT400. Exhibit at the Washford Radio Museum.
1949. GEC Model BT1091B. 9-inch TV. Exhibit at the Washford Radio Museum.
May 1949.
September 1953. Model BT5147.
September 1953. Model BT4544, BT5543 and BT6542.
1953. Model 6738. Exhibit at Amberley Working Museum.
1954. Model 5444. Exhibit at Amberley Working Museum.
1954. Model 5445. Exhibit at Amberley Working Museum.
September 1954.
March 1955.
1955.
Model BC 6936.
1956. Model 5645. Exhibit at Amberley Working Museum.
1959.Transistor Assembly Lines, Hazel Grove Factory.
Portable Radio.

Note: This is a sub-section of GEC

WWI Heavily involved in war work including making radios and valves

1922 Participated in the formation of the British Broadcasting Corporation

1930 Advert for GECoPhone - a 3 valve, all-electric radio operated by a.c. mains; price included Osram valves[1].

1936 Demonstration of GEC television sets at Wembley receiving signals from the BBC transmitter at Alexandra Palace; the sets could receive both the 25 frames/s and the 50 frames/s signals that the BBC transmitted [2]. Started production of cathode ray tubes.

1939 Competition in radios continued to depress prices[3].

1960 A new company was formed in conjunction with Pillar Holdings to extend the system of Piped Television that it owned in South Wales; the company would be called General Piped Television Ltd; GEC had a minority interest[4]. GEC did preparatory research for the company and manufactured the equipment. Pillar agreed not to sell televisions outside Wales.

1962 GEC sold its shares in General Piped Television to Pillar Holdings[5]


See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. The Times, 4 November 1930
  2. 4 September 1936
  3. The Times, 30 June 1939
  4. The Times, Jan 07, 1960
  5. The Times, Nov 29, 1962