Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

Registered UK Charity (No. 115342)

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Edward Heaton and Son

From Graces Guide

of the Star Boiler Works, Holt Town, Manchester.

1875 'A PONDEROUS STEAM BOILER.— On Thursday some interest was excited at the upper end of the town [Abergavenny] at the appearance of a boiler of huge dimensions, which was being conveyed from the goods wharf at the London and North-Western Riilway Station to the mill of Messrs. Tucker Brothers. The boiler, which was 27ft. long by 7ft. in diameter, and weighed 16 tons, was drawn upon a low powerfully built trolley, constructed for the purpose, by an excellent train of eight of Messrs. Tucker's horses, and was accompanied by several of the workmen from the foundry of Mr. Edward Heaton, Holt Town, Manchester, where it was constructed. .....' [1]

1876 New Patents: Edward Heaton, of Manchester, for improvements in apparatus for punching or perforating boiler plates and other metal plates; 26th April. [2]

1888 'A BIG BOILER.- On Friday evening last the employees of the Kinson Pottery with a few friends were invited by the proprietor (Mr. W. Carter) to a supper at the Lyceum Hall to commemorate the laying down of a new boiler. The boiler is follows:— A Lancashire boiler 7ft. in diameter, working pressure 100lbs. It was manufactured by Messrs. Edward Heaton and Sons, Holt Town, Manchester, to the specification of the Manchester Steam Users Association. The weight of the shell alone is 14 tons. It was hauled to the pottery from the Poole Railway Station by Mr. C. Bantem, of Newtown. Fifteen horses were required to drag it on account of the heavy and hilly hills to the pottery. About 150 sat down to the supper, which was a most substantial one, consisting of roast beef and mutton and plum puddings. ....'[3]

1909 Supplied three boilers for the new Manchester Infirmary [4]


See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. Abergavenny Chronicle - Saturday 27 February 1875
  2. Preston Herald, 6 May 1876
  3. Bournemouth Guardian - Saturday 24 November 1888
  4. Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser, 6 July 1909