Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

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Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 163,364 pages of information and 245,906 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

David Napier by David Napier and David Bell: Note 20

From Graces Guide
Lancefield

20. LANCEFIELD

The "lands called Lancefield" formed part of the estate of Stobcross, and appear to have extended from a line between the present Hydepark Street and Lancefield Street, to the western boundary of the old burgh of Anderston, between Elliot Street and Finnieston Street. In 1821 David Napier purchased the eastern portion of this land, extending from the Clyde to Graham's Mills, from Mrs. Anne Gillespie or Mitchell, wife of the Rev. John Mitchell minister of the Secession Church, Anderston, the price paid being £2,700. Here he erected the extensive engine and boiler works long known as Lancefield Foundry; and on the river-side he constructed a tidal basin to accommodate vessels while receiving their machinery or undergoing repairs. "Lancefield Dock," with the lofty sheer-legs that distinguished it, formed, for many years, a prominent feature of the harbour; and it remained the only basin or dock at Glasgow till Kingston Dock was opened in 1867. At the north end he built Lancefield House.

Ultimately Robert Napier, who purchased the Lancefield property in 1841, sold the dock to the Clyde Trustees and it was then wholly removed in order to widen the harbour and improve the line of quay. Lancefield House was built by David Napier, and most of his family were born there. He was an office-bearer at that time in the original parish church of Anderston, and its records bear that "ironpillars made at Lancefield" were supplied, to replace pillars of wood, in connection with certain alterations of the church buildings. The plan (at end of book) shows the arrangement of the property when it was sold to his cousin, and indicates also the adjacent Lancefield Forge of Messrs. Fulton and Nelson, — the former being a brother-in-law of David Napier. It also shows, on south side of the Clyde, the first shipbuilding yards of Thomas Wingate and of Tod and McGregor.

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Foot Notes