Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

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Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 163,368 pages of information and 245,906 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

David Anderson Hendrie

From Graces Guide

David Anderson Hendrie (1861-1940)

Born the son of John Hendry and his wife Helen Napier

1898 Married at Inverness to Alexandrina Jessie Elizabeth Tulloch

1922 Chief Mech. Engr., South African Railways, Pretoria, South Africa.

1940 Died. 'Mr David Anderson Hendrie whose death occurred in Natal, was the youngest son of Major Hendrie of Castle Hendrie, Inverness, and was works manager and assistant locomotive superintendent on the Highland Railway Co., when in 1903 he left for South Africa, where on the unification of the South African railways in 1910, he was appointed chief mechanical engineer.'[1]

1940 Obituary. 'Mr David Anderson Hendrie, whose death occurred recently at Pietermaritzburg. Natal, had distinguished career in South Africa as a railway engineer. He was the youngest son of Major Hendrie, of Castle Heather, Inverness. In 1903 he left his position as works manager and assistant locomotive superintendent of the Highland Railway Company to take up an appointment under the Natal Government Railways as locomotive superintendent. Mr Hendrie brought all his energy and experience to bear on the immense traffic problems which existed at that time between Natal and the Witwatersrand goldfields, and he successfully designed locomotives to cope with the situation. Upon the unification of the South African railways in 1910 Mr Hendrie was appointed chief mechanical engineer, and a period of extensive developments in construction work was inaugurated. He designed the M.H. engine, the heaviest in the world on a 3ft. 6in. gauge, and it was a great success. He retired in 1922. A man of genial disposition and sterling character. Mr Hendrie was universally esteemed.'[2]

See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. Aberdeen Press and Journal - Friday 12 July 1940
  2. Aberdeen Weekly Journal - Thursday 18 July 1940