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Daniel Macnee

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Daniel Macnee (1838-1893)

1865 Daniel Macnee, Engineer, Cyclops Steel and Iron Works, Sheffield.[1]


1893 Obituary [2]

DANIEL MACNEE, second son of Sir Daniel Macnee, ho was President of the Royal Scottish Academy, was born in Glasgow on 23rd April 1838, and was educated in Glasgow and in Dumfries-shire.

After serving an apprenticeship as a mechanical engineer for five years to the firm of Messrs. Smith and Rodger, marine-engine builders, Glasgow, he commenced in 1858 a pupilage as a civil engineer under Mr. Edward Wilson, engineer to the West Midland Railway, Worcester, and was engaged on the construction of various branch lines, and of the railway between Honeybourne and Stratford-on-Avon.

In 1862 he was appointed resident engineer and district superintendent of the Newport Abergavenny and Hereford section of the West Midland Railway. During the time he held that post the Taff Vale extension to Mountain Ash and several other branches were constructed under his superintendence.

In 1864 he entered the service of Messrs. Charles Cammell and Co., Sheffield, as their engineer; and during the four years he remained, with them he erected new works at Penistone and Grimesthorpe.

In 1868 for the Royal Commission on Irish Railways he valued and reported upon the whole of the workshops, machinery, engines, and rolling stock of all the railways south of Dublin.

In 1869 he entered into partnership with the firm of Messrs. Joseph Armstrong and Co., Rotherham, manufacturers of railway points and crossings, and ironwork for permanent way and for rolling stock.

In 1877 he commenced practice as an engineer and contractor in Rotherham, where he was engaged first in planning and laying out the Sandiacre Wagon Works near Trent; and afterwards in 1879 in designing and building the railway points and crossing department of the Anderston Foundry Co.'s works at Port Clarence near Middlesbrough.

In 1880 he removed to Westminster, where he acted as representative of the Anderston Foundry Co.

Among his inventions was a throw-over lever-box for actuating railway points; and a railway axle-box, from which the dust was excluded by a sliding metallic ring at the back of the box, pressed lightly into contact with the nave of the wheel.

Towards the end of 1892 he had an attack of blood- poisoning, followed by dropsy; and after an illness of more than six months he died on 30th June 1893, at the age of fifty-five.

He became a Member of this Institution in 1865.


1893 Obituary [3]

DANIEL MACNEE, eldest surviving son of the late Sir Daniel Macnee, President of the Royal Scottish Academy, was born on the 23rd of April, 1838.

After being educated at Glasgow and in Dumfriesshire, he served an apprenticeship of five years to Smith and Rodger of Glasgow (now the London and Glasgow Engineering and Shipbuilding Company). Before completing his pupilage he attracted the notice of the late Edward Wilson, then Engineer to the West Midland Railway (since amalgamated with the Great Western Railway), who made an opening for him on the staff of that line.

He was articled to Mr. Wilson in 1858 and was engaged on the construction of the railway between Honeybonrne and Stratford-on-Avon.

In 1862 he was appointed Resident Engineer and District Superintendent of the Newport, Abergavenny and Hereford section, or South Wales Division, of the West Midland Railway. During the time he held that post he completed the Taff Vale extension to Mountain Ash and constructed several branches.

In 1866 Mr. Macnee left the service of the West Midland Railway Company to take up the appointment of Engineer to Charles Cammell and Co, for which firm he erected new works at Penistone and Grimesthorpe. Three years later he resigned this post and became a junior partner in the firm of Joseph Armstrong and Co of Rotherham, manufacturers of railway-points, crossings and other permanent-way material. In the previous year, at the request of the Royal Commission OD Irish railways, he valued and reported upon the whole of the workshops, machinery, engines and rolling-stock of all the companies south of Dublin.

Mr. Macnee’s connection with the firm of Joseph Armstrong and Company lasted until 1877, when he set up in practice on his own account as a Civil Engineer and contractor, at first in Rotherham and subsequently in Westminster. He made surveys for and designed and erected the wagon shops at Sandy Acre, near Trent.

He acted as London representative for the Anderston Foundry Company during the last fifteen years of his life.

Towards the end of 1892 Mr. Macnee was attacked by dropsy, which was soon followed by other serious complications. He was unable to recover his strength and after six months’ illness passed away on the 30th of June, 1893.

In his professional life he was energetic and zealous, which qualities, combined with a generous disposition and a pleasant manner, made him greatly esteemed by all with whom he came into contact.

He was elected a Member of the Institution on the 11th of January, 1887.


1894 Obituary [4]

DANIEL MACNEE died on June 30, 1893, at the age of fifty-five. Son of Sir Daniel Macnee, President of the Royal Scottish Academy, he was born in Glasgow on April 23, 1838. After serving an apprenticeship as a mechanical engineer and a pupilage as a civil engineer, he was engaged on the construction of various branch lines of railway.

In 1864 he entered the service of Messrs. Charles Cammell & Co., of Sheffield, as their engineer. In 1869 he joined the firm of Messrs. Joseph Armstrong & Co., of Rotterdam, manufacturers of railway ironwork.

In 1877 he began practice as an engineer at Rotterdam, and laid out several important works.

In 1879 lie designed and built the railway points and crossing department of the Anderston Foundry Company's works at Port Clarence, near Middlesbrough. He was acting as representative of that company in Westminster at the time of his death.

He was a member of the Institution of Civil Engineers, and of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers. He was elected a member of the Iron and Steel Institute in 1881.


See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. 1865 Institution of Mechanical Engineers
  2. 1893 Institution of Mechanical Engineers: Obituaries
  3. 1893 Institution of Civil Engineers: Obituaries
  4. 1894 Iron and Steel Institute: Obituaries