Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

Registered UK Charity (No. 115342)

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 163,352 pages of information and 245,904 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Conwy Suspension Bridge

From Graces Guide
The Suspension Bridge can be seen in the background of this picture of the construction, in 1848, of the Conwy tubular bridge
2016
2016
2016
This way for Holyhead and points west. Typical Telford turnpike gate

Conwy/Conway suspension bridge

1822 In the course of improving the roads from Chester and Shrewsbury to Holyhead, Thomas Telford built his two famous suspension bridges over the Conwy River and the Menai Strait in Wales. William Hazledine supplied the wrought and cast iron.

1826 The bridge was completed

1904 Mr. J. Webster CE, was employed to survey the structure and found grave cause for anxiety; the main suspension chains were very badly corroded; the suspension rods were also in a bad condition. All the suspension rods and pins were replaced, and steel cables fixed above the suspension links. It was also decided to build a stiffening girder coupled to the suspension rods on each side of the bridge, and at the same time to widen the bridge by building a footway 6ft. wide outside the suspenders on the north side of the bridge[1].
Note: The article stated that '... the main links forming tbe suspension chains were very badly corroded, and considerably reduced from the original section in many places; the suspension rods were also in a bad condition, corroded, split, and very much pitted; the pins conncting the suspension rods to the links were also very much corroded and reduced in section.' However, the statement about corrosion of the main links must be erroneous, because the article goes on to state that 'When the anchorages were completed, and the old chain fitted with the new suspender links and pins, ....'

At some point a suspension bridge for pedestrians was built between Telford's bridge and the Conwy Railway Bridge. It can be seen in several photographs here.

1958 A New Conway Bridge was opened to replace the function of Telford's bridge in carrying the A55 across the river.

See here for an excellent series of photographs showing details of construction.

See also Conwy Railway Bridge.

Details

As built, the deck was supported by two tiers of wrought iron chains. Each tier was five links wide, the links being 9 ft long. They were connected by short fishplates, the joints being staggered (see Fig #). The deck was suspended from the fishplates by wrought iron eyebars of 1" square section. Thse bars were replaced in 1904 due to corrosion, and at the same time the chains were supplemented by wire cables located above the chains.

A stronger deck was installed in 1896.

See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. The Engineer 1904/05/20