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British Industrial History

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Cheadle Copper and Brass Co

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of Cheadle, Staffs, and of Birmingham, one of the most important brass and copper works of the 18th century.

1717 Thomas Patten erected a copper works at Bank Quay, Warrington[1]

1719 The Cheadle Company was formed by Thomas Patten and his associates; they took the lease on the Alton Mill which they converted to making wire and established a new joint stock company for making wire[2]

1734 Cheadle Copper and Brass Company was formed in Staffordshire, to use copper mined in the Moorlands, for making brass pins[3].

1755 The partnership took over a copper works that Patten had set up (outside the partnership) at Greenfield in Flintshire.

1764 A brass wire manufactory was also set up at Greenfield.

1767 All of the various factories were brought within the partnership, including a works at Warrington.

1780 A small copper works at Cheadle was absorbed (presumably later Oakamoor Copper Works. Around the same time the Neath Abbey Copper Works was acquired.

1782 The Bank Quay works was closed

1790 Smelting works erected at Penclawdd in South Wales - this became Cheadle Brass Wire Co

1790 Copper ore had been mined at Ecton in the Manifold Valley from the mid-18th century. Thomas Patten (1720-1806) bought a tin-plate factory alongside the river at Oakamoor and developed a large copper works (Cheadle Copper and Brass Co). The Froghall to Uttoxeter canal was built in 1799-1811, linking Oakamoor to the Caldon Canal. The Cheadle Copper Co. thrived in the 19th century, specialising in copper wire. It finally closed in the 1960s.[4]

1847 Advert: 'TO MERCHANTS, MANUFACTURERS, AND OTHERS,
Requiring extensive Premises centrally situated.
TO be LET, either together or in parts, or SOLD entire, the extensive and substantially-built PREMISES in Edmund-street, Birmingham, erected without regard to , expense by the present owners and occupiers, the CHEADLE COPPER and BRASS COMPANY, who have now consolidated the Manufacture of Tubes at their Establishment, Oakamoor Mills, near Cheadle.
The Premises in the rear, which are approached by a spacious Carriage-entrance, comprise a very large and lofty two-story Mill, besides Workshops in the roof, in which is an eight-horse-power Steam- Engine, with Boiler; Chimney Stack and large Water Tank, three powerful Drawbenches, snd expensive Driving Machinery, three Soldering Hearths, and other expensive Fittings; also a two-story Warehouse, Casting Shop, and entire Yard enclosed.
The Premises in front comprise lofty and conveniently-arranged Warehouses and Offices, with large iron Safety Closet, spacious arched Vault, Water-closet, and other conveniences, and comfortable well-arranged Manager's House.
The situation is important, as forming a frontage to the alterations and improvements contemplated in the vicinity of the Town Hall. The whole is Leasehold for an unexpired term of 45 years from Lady-day, 1847, subject to a ground-rent of 17s. 6d. per annum.
For further particulars and to treat apply to Messrs. Chesshire and Son, Temple-row, Birmingham.'[5]

1849 Directory: Listed as metal rollers

1849 Directory: Listed as Tube Makers

1849 Directory: Listed as Wire Drawers

1852 Partnership dissolved on 32 December between John Wilson Patten, Latham Hanmer, Joseph Ingleby, and George Wragge, Oakamoor and Cheadle, Staffordshire, and Birmingham, under the firm of the Cheadle Copper and Brass Company

1852 Thomas Bolton purchased the assets of the Cheadle Copper and Brass Works from John Wilson Patten and Co. (established at Cheadle in 1719). The deal included Oakamoor Mills[6].



1790 Copper ore had been mined at Ecton in the Manifold Valley from the mid-18th century. In 1790 Thomas Patten bought a tin-plate factory alongside the river at Oakamoor and developed a large copper works (Cheadle Copper and Brass Co). The Froghall to Uttoxeter canal was built in 1799-1811, linking Oakamoor to the Caldon Canal. The Cheadle Copper Co. thrived in the 19th century, specialising in copper wire. It finally closed in the 1960s.[7]


See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. Some founders of the chemical industry, by J Fenwick Allen, 1907[1]
  2. English Brass and Copper Industries to 1880, by Henry Hamilton [2]
  3. Staffordshire Working Lives [3]
  4. [4] Peak District Information - Oakamoor, Staffordshire
  5. Aris's Birmingham Gazette - Monday 26 July 1847
  6. National Archives [5]
  7. [6] Peak District Information - Oakamoor, Staffordshire