Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

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Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 163,365 pages of information and 245,906 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Charles Wright Younghusband

From Graces Guide

Lieutenant General Charles Wright Younghusband. (1821-1899).

1851 Charles Younghusband 29, Captain Royal Artillery, lived in Plumstead, with Mary E Younghusband25, Mary F Younghusband 3, Charles E Younghusband 2, Frank C Younghusband 2 Mo[1]


Obituary (1821-1899).[2]

"...He was the son of the late Major-General Younghusband, R.A. He was born in 1821, and obtained his first commission in 1837. He saw active service in the Crimea, having the Crimean and Turkish medals, with clasps for Inkerman and Sevastopol. He was, however, much better known for his scientific than for his combatant work. He took part in the Magnetic Survey, and was stationed at Toronto for this purpose from 1847 to 1854. He was employed in the purchase of swords and weapons from Solingen and elsewhere in Prussia. and Belgium from 1857 to 1863, when he was appointed a member of the Ordnance Committee, on which he served until 1867. He was appointed superintendent of the Powder Works at Waltham Abbey, which post he occupied until 1875, when he became superintendent of the Royal Gun Factories in the Royal Arsenal, where he remained until 1880, when he retired as Major-General. He had been associated with Sir Andrew Noble in work which ended in the introduction of the so-called new type guns, in which high muzzle velocities were developed by the use of slow-burning powder in long bores. General Younghusband was also employed in special individual work, such as attending foreign experiments. After his retirement he became connected with Elswick.

His son, the late Captain Younghusband, R.N., afterwards held the position of superintendent of the Gun Factories, General Maitland coming between the father's and son's terms of superintendence. Both father and son were remarkable, but in very different ways. The son was a vigorous man, full of resource and with real power of design, while his manner was brusque. The father was a man of refined intellect, who went carefully and fairly into questions, and came to sound scientific conclusions. The son, in fact, was more of an inventor; the father more of a judge. The son was very valuable in his special department.

The father's powers, if less than those of his son in construction, were of wider range, and he was universally liked in England and abroad. It would be well for the service if there were more Younghusbands coming into it.



See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. 1851 census
  2. The Engineer 1899/11/03, p438.