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Charles Godfrey Jameson

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Charles Godfrey Jameson (c1879-1929) of the British Aluminium Co


1930 Obituary [1]

CHARLES GODFREY JAMESON died on December 24, 1929, in a nursing home in Edinburgh, at the age of fifty.

He was born at King Williamstown, South Africa, where he matriculated. His technical education was carried out at Cambome and the Royal School of Mines.

After completing his studies in 1902 he was appointed an Assistant Mining Engineer with Messrs. Werner Beit & Co. on the Rand Mines, Transvaal, ultimately being appointed Acting Manager in 1910. From that date he represented this firm in Rhodesia as consulting mining engineer until 1913, when he returned to England and joined the staff of the British Aluminium Co., Ltd., at Kinlochleven.

In 1920 he was appointed Manager of those works, where many varied and important developments were carried out under his able supervision. Mr. Jameson had been selected to undertake the management of the new Lochaber aluminium factory at Fort William, but, unfortunately, he did not survive to assume control of the new works in the planning and construction of which he had taken such an important part.

Mr. Jameson was the son of the late S. W. Jameson and nephew of the late Sir Starr Jameson. He had many and varied interests, being a keen sportsman, having rowed at Henley, and played golf, tennis and other games after giving up Rugby and cricket. He endeared himself to all with whom he came in contact owing to his charming personality, and his loss is mourned by his many friends in all walks of life.

Mr. Jameson was elected a Member of the Institute of Metals on March 17, 1914.— E. E. ECCLES.


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