Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

Registered UK Charity (No. 115342)

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 163,173 pages of information and 245,641 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Carlisle Canal

From Graces Guide

Carlisle Canal Also known as the Carlisle and Solway Ship Canal

Engineer was William Chapman. Assisted by Richard Buck and his brother Henry Buck. Also Thomas Ferrier was overseer.

1819 April. The Carlisle Canal Bill passes through Parliament and receives the Royal Assent.[1]

1819 May. First AGM of the Carlisle Canal Co held.[2]

1820 July. 'A considerable number of large oak trees (some of them more than four feet diameter) have been discovered excavating the Carlisle Canal, the vicinity of the Solway, beneath thick stratum of clay, and under the foundation of the celebrated Roman Wall.'[3]

1821 Principal contractors are Millington and Bainbridge.[4]

1821 March. First stone the Carlisle Canal Basin was laid.[5]

1821 December. Last stone the Carlisle Canal Basin was laid.[6]

1822 May. Water is now let into the Carlisle Canal, from the basin to Beaumont, a line of about four miles.[7]

1823 March. The canal opened linking Carlisle to the Solway Firth, to facilitate the transport of goods to and from the city.[8]

1824 Suggested continuation of the Solway Frith and Carlisle Canal, to Newcastle.[9]

1852 Proposal to convert to a railway to be made to Parliament.[10] The line is unprofitable due to the Carlisle and Maryport Railway.[11]

1854 It was short-lived, being replaced by a railway which used the canal bed for most of its route.

1854 For Sale. 'LARGE PUMPING ENGINE, which has been employed in pumping water from the River Eden, for the supply of the late Carlisle Canal. The Engine was built by Messrs. Harvey and Co., of Hayle, Cornwall, erected at a cost of upwards of £4,000, and is now nearly good as new. The Cylinder is 60 inches in diameter, length of stroke, 10 feet, has two boilers attached, 26 feet long each, outside case, 6 ft. 4 in. diameter, inside tube, 4 ft. 2 in. diameter, both in good condition. The pump is fitted with patent double beat valves, and is 45 inches diameter, and 8 feet stroke. By order of the Port Carlisle Dock and Railway Company. Wm. WARD. Carlisle'[12]


See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. Carlisle Patriot - Saturday 10 April 1819
  2. Carlisle Patriot - Saturday 08 May 1819
  3. Durham County Advertiser - Saturday 08 July 1820
  4. Cumberland Pacquet, and Ware's Whitehaven Advertiser - Monday 12 March 1821Cumberland Pacquet, and Ware's Whitehaven Advertiser - Monday 12 March 1821
  5. Cumberland Pacquet, and Ware's Whitehaven Advertiser - Monday 26 March 1821
  6. Cumberland Pacquet, and Ware's Whitehaven Advertiser - Monday 24 December 1821
  7. Cumberland Pacquet, and Ware's Whitehaven Advertiser - Monday 20 May 1822
  8. Inverness Courier - Thursday 27 March 1823
  9. Cumberland Pacquet, and Ware's Whitehaven Advertiser - Tuesday 23 November 1824
  10. Carlisle Journal - Friday 09 July 1852
  11. Carlisle Patriot - Saturday 09 April 1853
  12. The Cornish Telegraph - Wednesday 22 February 1854