Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

Registered UK Charity (No. 115342)

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 150,664 pages of information and 235,203 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

C. A. Meissner

From Graces Guide

C. A. Meissner (1859-1930)


1930 Obituary [1]

C. A. MEISSNER died at Steubenville, Ohio, U.S.A., on October 13, 1930.

Born at Staten Island, N.Y., in 1859, he graduated in chemistry at the Columbia School of Mines in 1880, and then became an assistant chemist with the Joliet Steel Co. A year later he became assistant superintendent of the Brier Hill Iron and Coal Co., only to return to his former employers three years later as head chemist.

In 1886 he was appointed general manager of the Sterling Iron and Railway Co., and in 1889 he went to Birmingham, Ala., as vice-president and general manager of the Vanderbilt Iron and Steel Co. In 1895 he became general manager of the Londonderry Iron Co., Ltd., in 1899 manager of the mineral department and acting assistant general superintendent of the Dominion Iron and Steel Co., Ltd., at Sydney, British Columbia, and in 1904 he went to Montreal as assistant to the executive officer of the Canada Iron Co., Ltd., and the Londonderry Iron and Mining Co., Ltd.

Shortly afterwards he moved to New York to be assistant to the president of the then newly formed United States Steel Corporation; when that firm set up its technical committees on coke, blast- furnace practice, limestone and coal-washing, he was made chairman of them.

Mr. Meissner was a well-known member of the American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers, of which body he was vice-president from 1926 to 1928.

He became a member of the Iron and Steel Institute in 1925.



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