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British Industrial History

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Brampton Brothers

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of Oliver Street Works, and Rocky Lane, Birmingham,

Brampton Brothers were manufacturers of cycle chain and cycle fittings, cycle saddles.

c.1886 Experimented with self-lubricating bicycle chains.

1892 Cycle saddle makers, 25 Masshouse Lane, Birmingham[1]

c.1895 The old established business was carried on by Charles Henry Brampton, Frederick William Brampton, Walter Brampton and Arthur Brampton at Oliver St. (presumably F. Brampton and Co) and Chester St., Birmingham. About 1000 employees[2].

1897 Established as a public company. Directors are: Ebenezer Parkes, Charles Henry Brampton, Frederick William Brampton and George Illiston. Also mentions Walter Brampton and Arthur Brampton. Employed 1,000 people. The company made chains and fittings for cycles and spring forks for motor cycles, but were also involved in other products, including chains and parts for early automobiles. The company was registered on 11 May, to take over the business of cycle chain manufacturers of the firm of the same name. [3] [4] [5]

1897 A branch chain works was opened in Calais[6]

1899 Patented the integral bush/inner plate chain upon which so many cycle chains have been based.

1900 Petition to wind the company up.[7]

1903 Cycle component manufacturers, of Oliver St Works and Chester St[8]

1904 The Brampton Chain Company of Cookley began to manufacture wheels for heavy commercial vehicles on the Ironworks site.

1913 This laid the foundation of the successful Steel Stampings when road transport developed[9]

1915 The Calais works became the subsidiary Brampton Brothers (Calais) Ltd., which in turn developed into the Societe Anonyme des Etablissements Brampton in 1921.

The Calais works manufactured shell parts during the First World War and later produced light and heavy driving chains. New Birmingham works were erected, at Witton, after the war.

1920 September. Exhibited at the Machine Tool and Engineering Exhibition at Olympia with power transmission chains. [10]

1925 The company was purchased by the Coventry Chain Co [11]

1933 Renold and Coventry Chain Co had been reorganising Brampton Brothers but the business was not yet back in profit[12]

2006 Cookley works was called Titan Steel Wheels.


See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. 1892 Kelly's Directory of Birmingham
  2. The Times, May 17, 1897
  3. The Stock Exchange Year Book 1908
  4. The Times, Monday, May 17, 1897
  5. London Daily News - Monday 17 May 1897
  6. The Times, Oct 27, 1904
  7. [1] Gazette Issue 27177 published on the 27 March 1900. Page 34 of 88
  8. 1903 Kelly's Directory of Birmingham
  9. [2] Communigate
  10. The Engineer of 10th September 1920 p244
  11. The Times, Monday, Nov 16, 1925
  12. The Times, Sep 02, 1933
  • [3] Manchester Archives Records, 1896-1955.