Grace's Guide

British Industrial History

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 135,408 pages of information and 217,020 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Benjamin Longbottom

From Graces Guide

Jump to: navigation, search

Sir Benjamin Longbottom (1876-1930) of Messrs. Electromotors, afterwards Messrs. Laurence, Scott and Electromotors, of Norwich and Manchester

1927 President of Manchester Association of Engineers.


1930 Obituary [1]

Sir BENJAMIN LONGBOTTOM'S business life was almost wholly associated with Messrs. Electromotors, afterwards Messrs. Laurence, Scott and Electromotors, of Norwich and Manchester.

He joined the firm as works manager in 1900 after having gained experience as an apprentice with Messrs. Andrews and Preece of Bradford, and later with the Phoenix Dynamo Company and the General Electric Company.

In 1901 he became general manager of Messrs. Electromotors and on the amalgamation of the firm with Messrs. Laurence, Scott, he became joint managing director of the new concern.

He was also a director of Messrs. Richard Johnson, Clapham, and Morris of Manchester.

During the War, Sir Benjamin took an active part in the work of the Advisory Committee of Munitions, the Electrical Trades Advisory (New Industries) Committee, and the Ministry of Labour Trades Advisory Committee.

In 1924 he was appointed chairman of the British National Committee of the First World Power Conference held at Wembley, and in connexion with this work he received the honour of knighthood in 1925.

He was chairman of the British Electrical and Allied Manufacturers' Association from 1922 to 1925, and was continuing to act as vice-president at the time of his death on lot May 1930.

He was elected a Member of the Institution in 1911, and he was also a Member of the Institution of Electrical Engineers.

In 1926-1927 he was President of the Manchester Association of Engineers. Sir Benjamin was born near Leeds in 1876.


1930 Obituary [2]

SIR BENJAMIN LONGBOTTOM died at his home at Totteridge on the 1st May, 1930, in his 54th year. Educated at Heath Grammar School, he received his training in electrical engineering at Ilkley College, and was an articled pupil with Messrs. Andrews and Preece, Ltd., Bradford, from 1892 to 1895.

He was subsequently with the Phoenix Dynamo Co., Bradford, as an improver, and in May, 1898, he became superintendent engineer in charge of outside power work for the General Electric Co., Manchester.

During his last 15 months with the firm he was assistant works manager. At the age of 24 he became general manager and engineer of Electromotors, Ltd. (now Laurence, Scott and Electromotors, Ltd.), a company which owed much of its subsequent success to his organizing ability. Under his leadership the firm began to manufacture in bulk a complete range of component parts suitable for d.c. motors of from 0.5 to 20 h.p.; this was an entire departure from standard practice and enabled new machines to be assembled and delivered to order within a short and definite period of time. The immediate success of this policy was a tribute to his energy and foresight, and the long-continued prosperity of the firm bears witness to his consistent enthusiasm for good work.

During the War he rendered valuable service to the Electrical Advisory Committee appointed by the Ministry of Munitions, and the Electrical Trades Committee.

For some years he was a member of the Council of the British Electrical and Allied Manufacturers' Association, being chairman of that body from 1922 to 1925. During this period the Association organized one of the most successful exhibits in the Wembley Exhibition. His keen interest in public affairs found an outlet in the activity which he displayed on the board of the Manchester Chamber of Commerce. He was knighted in 1925.

While still remaining manager of Electromotors, Ltd., he was also vice-chairman of Richard Johnson, Clapham and Morris, Ltd., and a director of Lo-Thermo Patents, Ltd. He was chairman of the executive committee of the World Power Conference.

His death, occurring soon after that of Dr. S. Z. de Ferranti, was another severe loss to the industry as well as to a wide circle of friends to whom he had endeared himself by his genial and generous nature.

He joined the Institution as an Associate Member in 1904, became a Member in 1909 and served on the Council from 1924 to 1927.


1930 Obituary[3]

"THE LATE SIR B. LONGBOTTOM.

We regret to record the death of Sir Benjamin Longbottom, which occurred at Totteridge on Thursday, May 1, at the age of 53. This event, coming so shortly before the assembly of the Second Plenary World Power Conference in Berlin next month, makes it necessary to emphasise that Sir Benjamin was chairman of the British National Committee of the First World Power Conference, which was held at Wembley in 1924. The successful organisation and carrying through of that meeting was, in fact, largely due to his energy, and he was looking forward to participating, though in a less important and strenuous role, in the forthcoming gathering.

Benjamin Longbottom was born at Sower by Bridge, Yorkshire, on July 29, 1876, and received his early education at Ilkley College and the Heath Grammar School in that county. He subsequently served his apprenticeship with Messrs. Andrews and Preece, of Bradford, and also attended evening classes at the Bradford Technical College. In 1894 he joined the Phoenix Dynamo Co, where he successively held positions in the mechanical and electrical shops and in the drawing office, while from 1898 to 1900 he served with the General Electric Company as outside superintendent of their electrical power installations and as assistant works manager of their engineering department.

In the latter year he was appointed works manager and engineer of Messrs. Electromotors Limited, Manchester, but after one year in this position became general manager, a position he continued to hold until the amalgamation of the firm with Messrs. Laurence Scott, of Norwich, when he was appointed a joint managing director of the two firms. He was also a director of Messrs. Richard Johnson, Clapham and Morris, Limited, of Manchester. The former firm specialised in the manufacture of electric motors, mainly of small output, and had obtained a. high reputation for first-class workmanship and performance. Their factory at Openshaw was recently re-organised, and production methods of the most modern kind were introduced.

As a result of his work in connection with the World Power Conference, to which we have referred above, Mr. Longbottom received the honour of knighthood in 1925. He was elected a member of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers in 1911, and of the Institution of Electrical Engineers in 1909, serving as a member of Council of the latter body from 1924 to 1927. He was chairman of the British Electrical and Allied Manufacturers’ Association from 1922 to 1925, and was acting as a vice-president at the time of his death. He had also been President of the Manchester Association of Engineers, and had acted both as treasurer of the Manchester Chamber of Commerce and chairman of its engineering section. He was President of the Engineers Club, Manchester."


See Also

Loading...

Sources of Information