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British Industrial History

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Avon Power Station

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1945-52.
1945-52.
1945-52.
1945-52.
1945-52.
1945-52.
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1945-52.

Avon Power Station also referred to as Warwick Power Station, and Avon Generating Station.

c1920-1 Construction started with 2.5 MW BTH Turbine-Alternators (T/As) built at Rugby, and associated two no. Babcock and Wilcox boilers built at Glasgow. Steam pressure is thought to have been at 300psi.[1]

The power plant promoters and owners were the Leicestershire and Warwickshire Electric Power Co, later headquartered at Hinckley. The owners of this undertaking was Balfour Beatty, through the Tramways Light and Power Co., later the Midland Counties Electrical Supply Co.[2] The new Power Station replaced the Emscote tramway DC power plant which had been constructed adjacent to the tram depot in 1904. This Emscote site was retained as an AC/DC converter substation to continue supplies for the tramways.[3]

The sub station at Emscote which operated in the 1920s and 30's comprised AC/DC converters for supplying the tramways and local DC requirements. Similar converter plants were at Tavistock St. and Clements St. in Leamington serving a similar purpose.[4]

The station was supplied with coal via the Avon Bridge exchange sidings connected to the Great Western Railway.[5]

Early 1930s - Two additional BTH 6.5 MW T/As with associated four no. Babcock and Wilcox boilers were installed. The original coal hoist for the boilers was incorporated in the extended boiler house.[6]

During World War II two BTH 15 MW Turbine-Alternators with associated two no. higher pressure Babcock and Wilcox boilers of 400 psi 600'F were installed. A pressure reducing valve was also installed to provide in addition steam to the existing low pressure plant. The maximum output of the station was 51 MWs.[7]

1948 Ownership passed to the British Electricity Authority at nationalisation in April.[8]

1957 The Power Station was transferred to the Central Electricity Generating Board in 1957 when it was created.[9]

The coal supply to the station ceased in the mid 1960s, after which the modest supply needed for the station in its latterly reserve capacity was supplied by road lorries.[10]

Late 1960s - The power station closed.[11]

See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. Avon Power Station, Emscote, Warwick by Chris Capewell.
  2. Avon Power Station, Emscote, Warwick by Chris Capewell.
  3. warwickshirerailways.com
  4. Avon Power Station, Emscote, Warwick by Chris Capewell.
  5. Avon Power Station, Emscote, Warwick by Chris Capewell.
  6. Avon Power Station, Emscote, Warwick by Chris Capewell.
  7. Avon Power Station, Emscote, Warwick by Chris Capewell.
  8. Avon Power Station, Emscote, Warwick by Chris Capewell.
  9. warwickshirerailways.com
  10. Avon Power Station, Emscote, Warwick by Chris Capewell.
  11. Avon Power Station, Emscote, Warwick by Chris Capewell.