Grace's Guide

British Industrial History

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Abingdon-Ecco

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1918. From ‘Kempes Year Book’
1919. From The Motor Cycle of 11th December 1919.

of 143-4 Holborn, London

of Kings Road, Tyseley, Birmingham

1906 The company was registered on 27 August, to take over the Abingdon Works Co and the Ecco Works. [1]

1907 At around this time the company joined with the East London Rubber Co to make Kerry-Abingdon motorcycles for that firm, who bought and sold in preference to manufacturing. This arrangement continued until 1915.

1908 The company moved to new premises in Kings Road, Tyseley

The firm of Abingdon, Ecco, Limited was famous for the production of the King Dick adjustable spanner and motor cycle.

WWI It reorganised its machine shop to meet wartime demand. Produced fuses, trench warfare primers, stud lockets, and 18-pounder fuse sockets, as well as spanners and tool kits for motor cycles for Army use.[2]

1925 They changed their name to the initials of AKD. They continued their production from premises at Tyseley, Birmingham.

1931 The receiver for debenture holders of Abingdon Works Ltd advertised the business for sale as a going concern[3]


Motorcycles

1905 The company entered the motorcycles market with a machine that had the King Dick name. Their machines, typical of the era, ranged from 2hp to 3.5hp, with solos and tricycles available. They began to make their own four-stroke 350cc single and 794cc V-twin engines. The company first used proprietary engines, such as Fafnir, Kerry, Minerva and MMC but later built their own singles and V-Twins.

In 1905 and 1906, produced the 5 hp (4 kW) AKD tricar.

1907 At around this time the company joined with the East London Rubber Co to make Kerry-Abingdon motorcycles for that firm, who bought and sold in preference to manufacturing. This arrangement continued until 1915.

1910 A neat 3.5hp model was produced, soon followed by a 6hp V-twin. Both were belt-driven and had a three-speed rear hub. There were also two large singles of 499cc and 623cc. The company made the engine itself, but later it was supplied to other firms.

1913-1917 For a list of the models and prices of motorcycles see the 1917 Red Book

Post WWI. The same two models continued.

1922 For that year only, a 4.25hp single was produced.

1924 The range had been reduced to two singles and a twin.


See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. The Stock Exchange Year Book 1908
  2. The Engineer 1918
  3. The Times (London, England), Thursday, Feb 05, 1931