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British Industrial History

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A. Ransome and Co

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1869.
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January 1872.
1872. Pneumatic Exhaust Apparatus for Removing Shavings.
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1889. Patent Saw Bench.
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1904. Horizontal reciprocating log saw.
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1909. Guard for wood moulding machines.
1909. Hollow chisel mortising machine.
Grind Stone. Exhibit at Launceston Museum, Tasmania.
1910. A large band saw.
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1928. Log cross cutting saw.
Saw bench.Exhibit at the Chatham Dockyard.

of Stanley Works, Chelsea, Battersea and later of Stanley Works, Newark-on-Trent, sawmill engineers and ironfounders.

1868 Allen Ransome became senior partner of Samuel Worssam and Co; he took Frederic Josselyn into partnership and changed the name to A. Ransome and Co; the firm was in Chelsea, London[1]. The company produced woodworking machinery.

A foundry was subsequently acquired in Battersea and run with Vincent Sydney Woods as an additional partner as Ransome, Josselyn and Woods.

1870 See Allen Ransome and Co, sawmill engineers, of Kings Road, Chelsea

1888 Band Saw Guides. [2]

1892/3 the two businesses were amalgamated and became A. Ransome and Co Ltd.

1900 Announcement that A. Ransome and Co in consequence of a large increase in business have moved to Newark-on-Trent from their works in Chelsea and Battersea. [3] The Company, including the foundry, moved to Newark, Nottinghamshire. A London office was maintained at Chancery Lane.

1903 Agreement with Underfeed Stoker Co that, as high quality castings were needed for both Ransome's woodworking machines and for the stokers, the 2 companies would share the Newark factory.

1906 "R" and "M" Bearings, invented by Henry Marles, were first manufactured by Messrs. A. Ransome and Co., Ltd. They were first used on woodworking machines, and so successful was the result that many of the leading motor-car and lorry builders adopted them as standard.

1914 Saw Mill, General Engineers and Ironfounders. Specialities: Wood-working Machinery and Ball-Bearings. [4]

1915 A. Ransome and Co, sawmill engineers, at 43 Queen Victoria St, EC, and Stanley Works, Newark[5]

1917 They formed Ransome and Marles Bearing Co to exploit the bearings invented by Marles.

A. Ransome and Co Ltd were taken over by the woodworking firm of John Pickles and Son of Hebden Bridge, Yorkshire[6].

1931 As a result of court order in 1931, the business continued to be operated by the Receiver as a going concern until a sale of the goods and machinery the following year[7].

1933 In response to order from Chancery Division of the High Court, sale of engineering and foundry equipment and new woodworking machinery at Stanley Works[8].

1933 Engineering works of A. Ransome and Co was sold to Ransome and Marles Bearing Co Ltd, the occupants of the neighbouring works[9].


See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. Records and Correspondence of A. Ransome and Company Limited, Saw Mill Engineers and Iron Founders, Newark, Nottinghamshire, 1855-1931, held at Nottingham University Library, Department of Manuscripts and Special Collections[1]
  2. The Engineer of 6th April 1888 p284
  3. The Engineer of 21st September 1900 p305
  4. 1914 Whitakers Red Book
  5. Post Office London Directory, 1915
  6. Records and Correspondence of A. Ransome and Company Limited, Saw Mill Engineers and Iron Founders, Newark, Nottinghamshire, 1855-1931, held at Nottingham University Library, Department of Manuscripts and Special Collections[2]
  7. London Gazette 8 November 1932
  8. The Times, 18 February 1933
  9. The Times, 23 February 1933