Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

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Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 163,360 pages of information and 245,906 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Alexander Ernest Burchardt Ashton

From Graces Guide
(Redirected from A. E. Burchardt Ashton)
1912. Aviators certificate No 201.
1912. No 3 Squadron RFC. Alexander Ernest Burchardt Ashton is second from the right.
1912. After the accident.
1913. Lydd. This postcard was addressed to Miss Stella Burchardt-Ashton (sister) and had the note on the reverse: - 'A.B.-A. testing engine before a flight'

Lt Alexander Ernest Burchardt Ashton (1888-1916) (4th Dragoon Guards)

1912 May. Accident when his plane ran into a crowd of spectators and killed Leonard Williams aged 15. Verdict of accidental death and no blame attached to the pilot. [1]

The following extract is taken from a newspaper cutting (possibly the Morning Post – Monday 19 May 1913): -

“Now that the weather has taken so favourable a turn for aviation, the pilots of No.3 Squadron of the Royal Flying Corps at the Larkhill centre are putting in full time in adding to their knowledge of aircraft for military purposes. On Friday evening they carried out a scheme of reconnoitering on a carefully considered plan. Major J. A. F. Higgins, Lieutenant A.E. Burchardt-Ashton, Lieutenant Small, Lieutenant Conran and Lieutenant Anderson, each going alone, started from their base at the Larkhill Aerodrome and flew at varying altitudes over the Territorial camps on the Plain, and the accuracy of the reports brought back show how accustomed the Army airmen are becoming to note what is below them. The biplanes used for these flights were Henri and Maurice Farman's. Major J. F. A. Higgins on a Henri Farman and Major H.B. Brooke-Popham piloting an Avro, made in addition fast cross-country circular flights. On Saturday morning the Army airmen were again busy. Lieutenant Burrows and Lieutenant Conran made flights on Henri-Farmans. Lieutenant A. E. Burchardt-Ashton left Larkhill for a cross-country flight to Brighton, calling at Portsmouth for breakfast. Major G.H. Raleigh, piloting a BE type, accomplished a good performance in a cross-country flight from Farnborough to Larkhill and back to Farnborough. He took the direct course over Basingstoke and Andover on the outward and return journeys, and, flying at an average altitude of over 2000ft, covered the 100 miles in good time.”

The following is an extract from a local paper which is undated: -

PLIGHT OF ARMY AVIATORS UNABLE TO RESUME FLIGHT FROM MONMOUTH

“In the Monmouth neighbourhood it rained continuously form Sunday midnight until late on Monday night. During the day the Rivers Wye, Monnow, and Trothy rose rapidly and the Monnow in places has rushed on to the main roads just outside the town. At Rockfield the water on the main road was over the shafts of vehicles. Several carcases of sheep and pigs were noticed floating down the Monnow.

Two army aviators, Lieutenants Fox and Ashton, were delayed here because of the rain and mist. On Sunday they had had a successful flight from Weymouth to Monmouth in a biplane, and hoped to return to Salisbury Plain early on Monday morning, but at night the biplane remained on the Monmouth racecourse surrounded by pools of water.

The damage done to gardens and crops generally has been most serious.”


See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. The Times, Thursday, May 23, 1912
  • Des Bennett (grandson, Devon. 21st August 2010